When saving yourself means asking for help.




A U.S. Air Force pararescueman assists U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Gerald Barnett, left, via hoist into a HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopter as part of a water rescue exercise near Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, March 20, 2014. Barnett, senior enlisted adviser, is assigned to the 449th Air Expeditionary Group, and the pararescueman is assigned to the 82nd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron.
High-res

When saving yourself means asking for help.

A U.S. Air Force pararescueman assists U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Gerald Barnett, left, via hoist into a HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopter as part of a water rescue exercise near Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, March 20, 2014. Barnett, senior enlisted adviser, is assigned to the 449th Air Expeditionary Group, and the pararescueman is assigned to the 82nd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron.
Official gives Congress details on fatal helo attack.
A CH-47 Chinook helicopter comes in for a landing to pick up U.S. Army soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, following a mission to the Daymirdad District Center in Wardak province.
(Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Sean P. Casey, 982nd Combat Camera, 9 JAN 2011. Article by Nick Simeone of American Forces Press Service, 27 FEB 2014. Source.)
Two and a half years after 30 Americans were killed in what stands as the deadliest day for U.S. forces in the Afghanistan war, a top Defense Department official told Congress today no evasive action could have been taken that would have prevented Taliban insurgents from being able to fire at close range on an Army transport helicopter, an attack that killed everyone on board.
Garry Reid, the principal deputy assistant secretary of defense for special operations and low-intensity conflict, testified before the House Oversight and Government Reform committee to provide answers to relatives of the deceased, some of whom attended the hearing, who say they still don’t have clear answers about events on the night of Aug. 6, 2011, in Afghanistan’s Wardak province.
Among those killed in the attack were 17 Navy SEALs, as well as eight Afghans who also were aboard the helicopter. One U.S. military working dog also was killed.
The SEALS and an Army aviation battalion had spent weeks conducting night operations hunting Taliban fighters in Wardak’s Tangi Valley. On that night, intelligence indicated that a high-profile Taliban commander had been spotted near the SEALs’ base camp.
With Army Rangers searching on the ground, the SEAL team, along with Navy combat support specialists, airmen and an Army flight crew, were aboard the Chinook when it attempted to land and surprise the retreating enemy commander. Instead, the aircraft was fired upon by an undetected Taliban insurgent using a rocket-propelled grenade, sending it crashing in a ball of flame.
Reid told the House committee that a U.S. Central Command investigation determined the Taliban were hiding in a nearby building undetected by other U.S assets in the area, and they likely were tipped off by the sound of the approaching Chinook.
"They were able to hear and see the Chinook as it entered the valley, shooting at it from nearly head-on at a distance of less than 250 yards, leaving the pilot no chance to perform evasive maneuvers," he said.
The Chinook was not equipped to carry a flight recorder, and during today’s hearing, questions were raised about why it was also not equipped to counter rocket-propelled grenade fire. Reid said such technology isn’t yet available for this type of aircraft.
"Sadly, there is no technological solution that will guarantee the safety of those thrust into battle, particularly when helicopters are involved," he said, adding that he still believes the Chinook was appropriate for the mission.
"The fact remains we will always have to balance the tactical requirement to move troops quickly across the battlefield with the dangers of incurring lethal enemy fire and flying in extreme terrain," he added.
Reid told lawmakers that immediately after the loss, the Defense Department assigned the Helicopter Survivability Task Force, which was stood up two years before the incident, to examine potential ways to counter rocket-propelled grenade attacks.
"Unfortunately," he said, "the findings of this assessment were that technologies to enable the development of active protection systems for helicopters are immature and unproven."
The investigation found the crew that flew the ill-fated helicopter was experienced operating in the mountainous region, and that there was no indication that the enemy had any advance knowledge of its flight route and landing zone location, Reid said. In addition, the partnered Afghan forces operating with the Americans had been trained, vetted and with them since 2009.
"We believe the SEAL task force employed sound tactics in planning and executing their fateful mission, including the decision to load the entire element on a single aircraft," Reid said. He added that officials continue to look for ways to protect U.S. forces.
"We recognize that more needs to be done to help protect our forces, especially when they are so vulnerable in the air," he said.
Biographies: Garry Reid High-res

Official gives Congress details on fatal helo attack.

A CH-47 Chinook helicopter comes in for a landing to pick up U.S. Army soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, following a mission to the Daymirdad District Center in Wardak province.

(Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Sean P. Casey, 982nd Combat Camera, 9 JAN 2011. Article by Nick Simeone of American Forces Press Service, 27 FEB 2014. Source.)

Two and a half years after 30 Americans were killed in what stands as the deadliest day for U.S. forces in the Afghanistan war, a top Defense Department official told Congress today no evasive action could have been taken that would have prevented Taliban insurgents from being able to fire at close range on an Army transport helicopter, an attack that killed everyone on board.

Garry Reid, the principal deputy assistant secretary of defense for special operations and low-intensity conflict, testified before the House Oversight and Government Reform committee to provide answers to relatives of the deceased, some of whom attended the hearing, who say they still don’t have clear answers about events on the night of Aug. 6, 2011, in Afghanistan’s Wardak province.

Among those killed in the attack were 17 Navy SEALs, as well as eight Afghans who also were aboard the helicopter. One U.S. military working dog also was killed.

The SEALS and an Army aviation battalion had spent weeks conducting night operations hunting Taliban fighters in Wardak’s Tangi Valley. On that night, intelligence indicated that a high-profile Taliban commander had been spotted near the SEALs’ base camp.

With Army Rangers searching on the ground, the SEAL team, along with Navy combat support specialists, airmen and an Army flight crew, were aboard the Chinook when it attempted to land and surprise the retreating enemy commander. Instead, the aircraft was fired upon by an undetected Taliban insurgent using a rocket-propelled grenade, sending it crashing in a ball of flame.

Reid told the House committee that a U.S. Central Command investigation determined the Taliban were hiding in a nearby building undetected by other U.S assets in the area, and they likely were tipped off by the sound of the approaching Chinook.

"They were able to hear and see the Chinook as it entered the valley, shooting at it from nearly head-on at a distance of less than 250 yards, leaving the pilot no chance to perform evasive maneuvers," he said.

The Chinook was not equipped to carry a flight recorder, and during today’s hearing, questions were raised about why it was also not equipped to counter rocket-propelled grenade fire. Reid said such technology isn’t yet available for this type of aircraft.

"Sadly, there is no technological solution that will guarantee the safety of those thrust into battle, particularly when helicopters are involved," he said, adding that he still believes the Chinook was appropriate for the mission.

"The fact remains we will always have to balance the tactical requirement to move troops quickly across the battlefield with the dangers of incurring lethal enemy fire and flying in extreme terrain," he added.

Reid told lawmakers that immediately after the loss, the Defense Department assigned the Helicopter Survivability Task Force, which was stood up two years before the incident, to examine potential ways to counter rocket-propelled grenade attacks.

"Unfortunately," he said, "the findings of this assessment were that technologies to enable the development of active protection systems for helicopters are immature and unproven."

The investigation found the crew that flew the ill-fated helicopter was experienced operating in the mountainous region, and that there was no indication that the enemy had any advance knowledge of its flight route and landing zone location, Reid said. In addition, the partnered Afghan forces operating with the Americans had been trained, vetted and with them since 2009.

"We believe the SEAL task force employed sound tactics in planning and executing their fateful mission, including the decision to load the entire element on a single aircraft," Reid said. He added that officials continue to look for ways to protect U.S. forces.

"We recognize that more needs to be done to help protect our forces, especially when they are so vulnerable in the air," he said.

Biographies: Garry Reid

US Army Specialist Christopher A. Landis. 10 FEB 2014.

Died at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered during a rocket propelled grenade attack on their dismounted patrol in Kapisa Province, Afghanistan. Landis was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne) out of Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

Evening Quickie #soldierporn: Traffic jam.

Coalition force members waits for a herd of sheep to pass, so they can setup a helicopter landing zone in Balkh province, Afghanistan, Jan. 20, 2014. The troops were setting up the HLZ to return safely to FOB MES after participating in marksmanship training.

(U.S. Army photo by Spc. Stephen Cline, 20 JAN 2014.)

Late Night Nookie #soldierporn: Invisible scars.

A coalition forces member fires a Special Operations Forces Combat Assault Rifle (SCAR) during marksmanship training on a range on Kandahar Air Field, in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. Coalition forces qualified with various weapon systems to maintain their proficiency.

(U.S. Army Photo by Pfc. Dacotah Lane, 15 JAN 2014.)

US Army Sergeant Daniel T. Lee. 15 JAN 2014.

Died in Ghorband district of Parwan Province, Afghanistan, from wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with small arms fire during an Afghan-led clearing operation led by commandos of 6th SOK. Lee was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne) out of Fort Bragg, N.C.

The official ISAF HQ Public Affairs statement:

The mission, led by commandos of the 6th Special Operations Kandak and supported by ISAF special operations advisers, was conducted to disrupt insurgent activities in the district, including attacks on Bagram Airfield, and in support of Afghan National Security Forces’ tactical priorities. Local district and provincial officials were informed in advance of the operation and were provided updates during and after the actions.

The operation was conducted in a high threat area with Taliban activity, some linked to the Haqqani network. The insurgents in this area enjoy freedom of movement allowing them to harass and threaten the local population as well as stage and facilitate attacks. The majority of the intelligence for the operation was provided by Afghan forces. Qari Nazar Gul, Taliban Deputy Shadow Governor for Parwan Province and a member of the senior Taliban Commission, was known to operate in the area. Gul has ties to the Haqqani network and transports weapons, fighters and suicide bombers to Parwan and Kabul. Gul has conducted attacks against ANSF and coalition forces including a complex attack at Bagram Airfield. 

Noorullah is a mid-level Taliban Commander in Ghorband district who coordinates attacks and emplaces IEDs targeting ANSF patrols and check points in the area where this operation was conducted. He also distributes weapons, ammunition and rockets to Taliban fighters.

While moving through Ghorband district, ANSF commandos and their coalition advisers came under heavy fire from insurgents, resulting in the death of one ISAF service member. The force required defensive air support to suppress the enemy fire from two compounds. According to initial operational reports, at least 10 insurgents were killed. Tragically, two civilians inside a building from which insurgents were firing on the commandos were killed.

Specops sustainability.

An Afghan National Army commando recruit mans an M249 Squad Automatic Weapon  while securing an overwatch position during the commando selection and assessment course on Camp Commando near Kabul, Afghanistan.

(U.S. Army photo by Master Sgt. Michael J. Carden, 12 JAN 2014.)

Man becomes machine: TALOS, soldier of the future.
(Article by Donna Miles of American Forces Press Service, 31 DEC 2013. Source.)
WASHINGTON - U.S. Special Operations Command is using unprecedented outreach and collaboration to develop what its commander hopes will be revolutionary capabilities: a suit that’s been likened to the one worn by the “Iron Man” movies superhero that offers operators better protection, enhanced performance and improved situational awareness.
 The Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit, or TALOS, is the vision of Navy Adm. William H. McRaven, Socom’s commander. He challenged industry and defense representatives at a Socom conference in May to come up with the concepts and technologies to make the suit a reality.
Exactly what capabilities the TALOs will deliver is not yet clear, explained Michael Fieldson, Socom’s TALOS project manager. The goal is to provide operators lighter, more efficient full-body ballistics protection and super-human strength. Antennae and computers embedded into the suit will increase the wearer’s situational awareness by providing user-friendly and real-time battlefield information.
Integrated heaters and coolers will regulate the temperature inside the suit. Embedded sensors will monitor the operator’s core body temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, body position and hydration levels. In the event that the operator is wounded, the suit could feasibly start administering the first life-saving oxygen or hemorrhage controls.
Fieldson admitted that the analogy to the suit that the Tony Stark character wore in the “Iron Man” movies may be a bit of a stretch. The TALOS, for example, isn’t expected to fly.
But beyond that, there’s little that Fieldson — or anyone else at Socom — is ready to rule out.
In a departure from past practices of introducing new products piecemeal, adding bulk and weight to operators’ kit, the TALOS will be a fully integrated “system of systems,” Fieldson said. To offset the weight of computers, sensors and armor that make up the suit, operators will have an exoskeleton — a mechanism that carries the brunt of the load.
"The intent is to have this fully integrated system so you can provide the most capability at the lowest impact to the soldier," Fieldson said. "We think there is some efficiency to be gained if all the equipment is fully integrated as opposed to different components that are simply assembled on the human."
Keeping the systems and the exoskeleton powered will require more than today’s batteries can deliver. So along with the TALOS technologies, Socom is calling on the scientific and technical community to come up with reliable and portable power sources.
"We are really looking at stretching the bounds of science and technology," Fieldson said.
That’s led Socom to reach out to partners within DOD as well as industry and academia for help in pushing today’s technological limits.
The command is working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, as well as U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center and the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, among other DOD organizations, to tap into projects already underway.
DARPA, for example, is making headway on its Warrior Web project, designed to boost troops’ stamina and carrying capacity without sacrificing speed or agility. The concept includes a lightweight undersuit that would augment the efforts of the wearer’s own muscles.
"Many of the individual technologies currently under development show real promise to reduce injury and fatigue and improve endurance," said Army Lt. Col. Joseph Hitt, DARPA’s Warrior Web program manager. "Now we’re aiming to combine them — and hopefully some new ones, too — into a single system that nearly every soldier could wear and would provide decisive benefits under real-world conditions."
The Natick lab is busy identifying high-technology armor and mobility technologies with plans to integrate them into a first-generation TALOS system ready for demonstration by the end of June, reported Greg Kanagaki, project engineer for Natick’s Unmanned Equipment and Human Augmentation Systems Team.
Natick personnel also are serving as subject-matter experts for the TALOS project, particularly in the areas of mobility, human performance and thermal management, Kanagaki said.
Meanwhile, officials at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command say their programs have a direct application to TALOS as well.
"[The] requirement is a comprehensive family of systems in a combat armor suit where we bring together an exoskeleton with innovative armor, displays for power monitoring, health monitoring, and integrating a weapon into that — a whole bunch of stuff that RDECOM is playing heavily in," said Army Lt. Col. Karl Borjes, the command’s science adviser.
"RDECOM cuts across every aspect making up this combat armor suit," he said. "It’s advanced armor. It’s communications, antennas. It’s cognitive performance. It’s sensors, miniature-type circuits. That’s all going to fit in here, too."
Socom has called on the private sector, too, inviting not just its traditional industry partners, but also those who have never before worked with the command, to participate in the TALOS program.
"There is no one industry that can build it," Socom’s Senior Enlisted Advisor Army Command Sgt. Maj. Chris Faris said during a panel discussion at the command’s MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., headquarters, as reported by the Defense Media Network.
The outreach has generated a lot of interest. Socom’s TALOS planning session this past summer attracted representatives of 80 colleges, 10 universities and four national laboratories. At a demonstration in July, 80 companies demonstrated technologies ranging from advanced body armor, some using liquids that turn solid on impact, to power supplies to exoskeleton mechanisms.
Socom’s goal, Fieldson said, is to have a TALOS prototype within the next year and to have the suit ready for full field testing within five years. That timetable is revolutionary for the military research, development and acquisition world, even for rapid-equipping programs.
As the only combatant command with acquisition authority, Socom is able to accelerate the TALOS project, Fieldson explained. The command’s acquisition executive and research and development staff share a building at MacDill Air Force Base, which he said promotes close collaboration and speedy decision-making.
"We have access that is nontraditional and that absolutely helps us," Fieldson said. "We can bounce ideas back and forth against the leadership and ensure that what we are doing makes sense … I think that is critical to trying to develop this system within the timeline we are working toward."
Also, in a departure from traditional development projects, Socom’s Acquisition Center staff established an innovation cell to lead the effort, advised by operators and focused on transforming business processes to solve the extreme integration challenges associated with TALOS.
"Because of the technical challenges and the compressed timeline, we are going to take more ownership on the government side than we typically take," Fieldson said.
"We are going to go in and make some decisions that we sometimes rely on industry partners to make for us," he said. "That allows us to reach out to a broader audience. That way, if there is a great idea in some nontraditional organization, we can integrate it" without relying on a commercial company to do so.
"We are really changing the process," Fieldson said. "And the reason we are doing that is to try to streamline the overall effort and drive down both the cost and the schedule. That way, we get the best possible equipment to our force as quickly as possible."
Although the TALOS is initially intended for special operators involved in high-risk missions, it has implications for the conventional force as well, Fieldson said.
"We have a long history at Socom of developing things first and then the technology moving out to the broader force," he said. "We fully expect that to happen with this one as well. I think there will be a lot of spinoff technologies that the broader force will be able to use."
Meanwhile, McRaven remains the suit’s No. 1 proponent.
"I’m very committed to this," he told industry representatives at a July planning forum. "I’d like that last operator that we lost to be the last operator we lose in this fight or the fight of the future. And I think we can get there."
(Follow Donna Miles on Twitter: @MilesAFPS)
Contact AuthorBiographies:Navy Adm. William H. McRaven 
Related Sites:U.S. Special Operations Command Special Report: U.S. Special Operations CommandDefense Advanced Research Projects Agency U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center  High-res

Man becomes machine: TALOS, soldier of the future.

(Article by Donna Miles of American Forces Press Service, 31 DEC 2013. Source.)

WASHINGTON - U.S. Special Operations Command is using unprecedented outreach and collaboration to develop what its commander hopes will be revolutionary capabilities: a suit that’s been likened to the one worn by the “Iron Man” movies superhero that offers operators better protection, enhanced performance and improved situational awareness.

 The Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit, or TALOS, is the vision of Navy Adm. William H. McRaven, Socom’s commander. He challenged industry and defense representatives at a Socom conference in May to come up with the concepts and technologies to make the suit a reality.

Exactly what capabilities the TALOs will deliver is not yet clear, explained Michael Fieldson, Socom’s TALOS project manager. The goal is to provide operators lighter, more efficient full-body ballistics protection and super-human strength. Antennae and computers embedded into the suit will increase the wearer’s situational awareness by providing user-friendly and real-time battlefield information.

Integrated heaters and coolers will regulate the temperature inside the suit. Embedded sensors will monitor the operator’s core body temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, body position and hydration levels. In the event that the operator is wounded, the suit could feasibly start administering the first life-saving oxygen or hemorrhage controls.

Fieldson admitted that the analogy to the suit that the Tony Stark character wore in the “Iron Man” movies may be a bit of a stretch. The TALOS, for example, isn’t expected to fly.

But beyond that, there’s little that Fieldson — or anyone else at Socom — is ready to rule out.

In a departure from past practices of introducing new products piecemeal, adding bulk and weight to operators’ kit, the TALOS will be a fully integrated “system of systems,” Fieldson said. To offset the weight of computers, sensors and armor that make up the suit, operators will have an exoskeleton — a mechanism that carries the brunt of the load.

"The intent is to have this fully integrated system so you can provide the most capability at the lowest impact to the soldier," Fieldson said. "We think there is some efficiency to be gained if all the equipment is fully integrated as opposed to different components that are simply assembled on the human."

Keeping the systems and the exoskeleton powered will require more than today’s batteries can deliver. So along with the TALOS technologies, Socom is calling on the scientific and technical community to come up with reliable and portable power sources.

"We are really looking at stretching the bounds of science and technology," Fieldson said.

That’s led Socom to reach out to partners within DOD as well as industry and academia for help in pushing today’s technological limits.

The command is working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, as well as U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center and the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, among other DOD organizations, to tap into projects already underway.

DARPA, for example, is making headway on its Warrior Web project, designed to boost troops’ stamina and carrying capacity without sacrificing speed or agility. The concept includes a lightweight undersuit that would augment the efforts of the wearer’s own muscles.

"Many of the individual technologies currently under development show real promise to reduce injury and fatigue and improve endurance," said Army Lt. Col. Joseph Hitt, DARPA’s Warrior Web program manager. "Now we’re aiming to combine them — and hopefully some new ones, too — into a single system that nearly every soldier could wear and would provide decisive benefits under real-world conditions."

The Natick lab is busy identifying high-technology armor and mobility technologies with plans to integrate them into a first-generation TALOS system ready for demonstration by the end of June, reported Greg Kanagaki, project engineer for Natick’s Unmanned Equipment and Human Augmentation Systems Team.

Natick personnel also are serving as subject-matter experts for the TALOS project, particularly in the areas of mobility, human performance and thermal management, Kanagaki said.

Meanwhile, officials at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command say their programs have a direct application to TALOS as well.

"[The] requirement is a comprehensive family of systems in a combat armor suit where we bring together an exoskeleton with innovative armor, displays for power monitoring, health monitoring, and integrating a weapon into that — a whole bunch of stuff that RDECOM is playing heavily in," said Army Lt. Col. Karl Borjes, the command’s science adviser.

"RDECOM cuts across every aspect making up this combat armor suit," he said. "It’s advanced armor. It’s communications, antennas. It’s cognitive performance. It’s sensors, miniature-type circuits. That’s all going to fit in here, too."

Socom has called on the private sector, too, inviting not just its traditional industry partners, but also those who have never before worked with the command, to participate in the TALOS program.

"There is no one industry that can build it," Socom’s Senior Enlisted Advisor Army Command Sgt. Maj. Chris Faris said during a panel discussion at the command’s MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., headquarters, as reported by the Defense Media Network.

The outreach has generated a lot of interest. Socom’s TALOS planning session this past summer attracted representatives of 80 colleges, 10 universities and four national laboratories. At a demonstration in July, 80 companies demonstrated technologies ranging from advanced body armor, some using liquids that turn solid on impact, to power supplies to exoskeleton mechanisms.

Socom’s goal, Fieldson said, is to have a TALOS prototype within the next year and to have the suit ready for full field testing within five years. That timetable is revolutionary for the military research, development and acquisition world, even for rapid-equipping programs.

As the only combatant command with acquisition authority, Socom is able to accelerate the TALOS project, Fieldson explained. The command’s acquisition executive and research and development staff share a building at MacDill Air Force Base, which he said promotes close collaboration and speedy decision-making.

"We have access that is nontraditional and that absolutely helps us," Fieldson said. "We can bounce ideas back and forth against the leadership and ensure that what we are doing makes sense … I think that is critical to trying to develop this system within the timeline we are working toward."

Also, in a departure from traditional development projects, Socom’s Acquisition Center staff established an innovation cell to lead the effort, advised by operators and focused on transforming business processes to solve the extreme integration challenges associated with TALOS.

"Because of the technical challenges and the compressed timeline, we are going to take more ownership on the government side than we typically take," Fieldson said.

"We are going to go in and make some decisions that we sometimes rely on industry partners to make for us," he said. "That allows us to reach out to a broader audience. That way, if there is a great idea in some nontraditional organization, we can integrate it" without relying on a commercial company to do so.

"We are really changing the process," Fieldson said. "And the reason we are doing that is to try to streamline the overall effort and drive down both the cost and the schedule. That way, we get the best possible equipment to our force as quickly as possible."

Although the TALOS is initially intended for special operators involved in high-risk missions, it has implications for the conventional force as well, Fieldson said.

"We have a long history at Socom of developing things first and then the technology moving out to the broader force," he said. "We fully expect that to happen with this one as well. I think there will be a lot of spinoff technologies that the broader force will be able to use."

Meanwhile, McRaven remains the suit’s No. 1 proponent.

"I’m very committed to this," he told industry representatives at a July planning forum. "I’d like that last operator that we lost to be the last operator we lose in this fight or the fight of the future. And I think we can get there."

(Follow Donna Miles on Twitter: @MilesAFPS)

Contact Author

Biographies:
Navy Adm. William H. McRaven 

Related Sites:
U.S. Special Operations Command 
Special Report: U.S. Special Operations Command
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency 
U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center 

Just a little adrenaline-rush refreshment.
U.S. pararescuemen assigned to the 82nd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron get hoisted into an HH-60 Pave Hawk as part of a joint search and rescue training exercise between the 303rd ERQS and the Coastal Riverine Squadron One-Forward off the coast of Djibouti. This was an opportunity for Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa units to train with other units based at Camp Lemonnier, to test inter-service communication and expand mission capabilities.
(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Staci Miller, 20 DEC 2013.) High-res

Just a little adrenaline-rush refreshment.

U.S. pararescuemen assigned to the 82nd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron get hoisted into an HH-60 Pave Hawk as part of a joint search and rescue training exercise between the 303rd ERQS and the Coastal Riverine Squadron One-Forward off the coast of Djibouti. This was an opportunity for Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa units to train with other units based at Camp Lemonnier, to test inter-service communication and expand mission capabilities.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Staci Miller, 20 DEC 2013.)

Mamas don’t let your babies grow up to be Cowboys…

itsramez:

godandguns:

descentoficarus:

Sergeant Major Billy Waugh (Ret.)

-Served in 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Unit in Korea

-Green Beret from 1954 to 1972

-1965-Battle of Bong Son. Ambushed by an estimated 4,000 enemy while with his civil defense group. Receives severe wounds to head and legs to the extent he was thought dead by the enemy. Returns to Vietnam by the end of 1966 Earned a Silver Star and 6th Purple Heart for actions 

-Participates in first ever combat HALO jump

-Becomes CIA contractor in 1977. Does secret stuff. Tracks down Carlos the Jackal and Osama bin Laden.

-2001- At the age of 72, participates in Operation Enduring Freedom with CIA and 5th Special Forces Group.  Aided in uniting Northern Alliance against Taliban and Al Qaeda

nem igazán tudok ennél nagyobb badass csávót elképzelni. 72 évesen még Afganisztánban tolta.

Now thats a fucking Sergeant Major that the Army should have, not like the Joker we have!!!!