Curator’s Choice, SEP 2012: Brotherhood.
soldierporn:

"We are brothers forged in the fire of commitment, hardened by the hammer of war and sharpened by the stone of honor. By our sword of fortitude and faith, we can conquer all things."
- “Vigilance” / Operation Enduring Warrior (formerly Team X-T.R.E.M.E) X-Athlete [Source.]
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Curator’s Choice, SEP 2012: Brotherhood.

soldierporn:

"We are brothers forged in the fire of commitment, hardened by the hammer of war and sharpened by the stone of honor. By our sword of fortitude and faith, we can conquer all things."

- “Vigilance” / Operation Enduring Warrior (formerly Team X-T.R.E.M.E) X-Athlete [Source.]

elodieunderglass:

gimmeagoodcoldbeer:

ronin134:

revengeofthemudbutt:

armedplatypus:

whiskey-weather:

stonerdoomandbeagles:

shoothikedrinkfuck:

blazepress:

This three-legged decorated war hero had one leg lost to surgery after taking four rounds from an AK-47.

Bad. Mother. Fucker.

 Those eyes say “Pretend to throw the tennis ball. I dare you to only pretend.”

I think those eyes say a lot more than that. He’s seen more than I ever will, done more than I’ll ever do, and his war will never be over.

He’s got Ranger scrolls on his collar. That dog is a god damn hero.

I just noticed the Purple Heart and that Scroll.Wow. Just wow. The picture alone, in all it’s detail says a lot of things. god damn.

I can’t not reblog this dog… his youEyes say so much

I’ve never seen a dog with such a face like that. Like an old man who went to war and if you ask him about he just stiffens up and face turns to stone. 

Layka is a lady dog. Let’s remember that.
Now, it’s an understandable problem - our socialization instantly encourages us to see this rugged, sleek, military animal as a male. Three-legged hero dog with military decorations and stern-appearing eyes? TOTALLY A DUDE DOG, JUST LOOK AT HIM. It’s a programmed response, and nothing to be ashamed of - let’s just be accurate and note that Layka’s a female.
I’ve highlighted all the reblogs above where Layka is described as a hero, an old man, with male pronouns - rather than the fierce, charming heroine she is. It’s kind of a teachable moment: how does an image of an animal, displaying absolutely no secondary sex characteristics, instantly give us these fictional headcanons about its gender and gender performance? It’s an impressive demonstration of our ability to translate body language.
The photographer who took this compelling shot noted that Layka’s playful, bouncy energy made it nearly impossible for him to get a shot with her mouth closed! He ended up having to stop using the tennis ball he was using to get her attention, because it made her too excited and smiley. Based on the photos below, I think she’d have quite a sense of humor about the “where’s the tennis ball?” game!

Of course, the photographer did end up connecting with a fundamental aspect of Layka’s nature in the cover photo; her serious, soldier side. But that’s not all the animal is. Does the dog in the unused shots still resemble an “old man?” Is the dog in the unused shots male or female? Is it still a hero with its tongue out? Is it still admirable without a “face like stone?”
This is what I mean when I say that we have to examine the lenses of culture and society that we are always, always looking through when we talk about science biology.

[Not just when discussing science biology, though. This is a poignant example of the assumptions made by civilians when perceiving any combat veteran. The conclusions drawn in the comments, and the implications they represent for Layka, reflect just as strongly upon the almost insurmountable obstacles that a combat veteran encounters during reintegration, and for the rest of their lives. The Rambo Fallacy, alive and well. -R] High-res

elodieunderglass:

gimmeagoodcoldbeer:

ronin134:

revengeofthemudbutt:

armedplatypus:

whiskey-weather:

stonerdoomandbeagles:

shoothikedrinkfuck:

blazepress:

This three-legged decorated war hero had one leg lost to surgery after taking four rounds from an AK-47.

Bad. Mother. Fucker.


Those eyes say “Pretend to throw the tennis ball. I dare you to only pretend.”

I think those eyes say a lot more than that. He’s seen more than I ever will, done more than I’ll ever do, and his war will never be over.

He’s got Ranger scrolls on his collar. That dog is a god damn hero.

I just noticed the Purple Heart and that Scroll.
Wow. Just wow. 
The picture alone, in all it’s detail says a lot of things. god damn.

I can’t not reblog this dog… his you
Eyes say so much

I’ve never seen a dog with such a face like that. Like an old man who went to war and if you ask him about he just stiffens up and face turns to stone. 

Layka is a lady dog. Let’s remember that.

Now, it’s an understandable problem - our socialization instantly encourages us to see this rugged, sleek, military animal as a male. Three-legged hero dog with military decorations and stern-appearing eyes? TOTALLY A DUDE DOG, JUST LOOK AT HIM. It’s a programmed response, and nothing to be ashamed of - let’s just be accurate and note that Layka’s a female.

I’ve highlighted all the reblogs above where Layka is described as a hero, an old man, with male pronouns - rather than the fierce, charming heroine she is. It’s kind of a teachable moment: how does an image of an animal, displaying absolutely no secondary sex characteristics, instantly give us these fictional headcanons about its gender and gender performance? It’s an impressive demonstration of our ability to translate body language.

The photographer who took this compelling shot noted that Layka’s playful, bouncy energy made it nearly impossible for him to get a shot with her mouth closed! He ended up having to stop using the tennis ball he was using to get her attention, because it made her too excited and smiley. Based on the photos below, I think she’d have quite a sense of humor about the “where’s the tennis ball?” game!

Layka is so smiley in person that the photographer struggled to get her to pose "seriously."

Of course, the photographer did end up connecting with a fundamental aspect of Layka’s nature in the cover photo; her serious, soldier side. But that’s not all the animal is. Does the dog in the unused shots still resemble an “old man?” Is the dog in the unused shots male or female? Is it still a hero with its tongue out? Is it still admirable without a “face like stone?”

This is what I mean when I say that we have to examine the lenses of culture and society that we are always, always looking through when we talk about science biology.

[Not just when discussing science biology, though. This is a poignant example of the assumptions made by civilians when perceiving any combat veteran. The conclusions drawn in the comments, and the implications they represent for Layka, reflect just as strongly upon the almost insurmountable obstacles that a combat veteran encounters during reintegration, and for the rest of their lives. The Rambo Fallacy, alive and well. -R]

(via lilithsaintcrow)

For he today who sheds his blood with me shall be my brother.

ratak-monodosico:

National Geographic's June issue cover story is called ”Hero Dogs, A Soldier's Best Friend.” Layka, the proud dog featured on the cover, was recently recognized by an Air Force unit for her heroics in Afghanistan. The 3-year-old Belgian Malinois was dispatched to inspect a building for explosives and search for enemy combatants. She was ambushed, receiving several gunshot wounds to the abdomen and right front leg. Despite being gravely wounded, she protected the lives of her team by attacking and subduing the assailant. Luckily, Layka survived, but her injuries were so severe that doctors had to amputate one of her legs.

(via cametothecold)

This is how much you’re worth to your country.
andrewwadenunn:

If you have ever wondered how much your extremities are worth. Some of it doesn’t even sound all that bad…  Say you live to be 80 years old and lose both of your legs below the knee and one hand at 24 years of age, at $1,400 a month, that comes out to be in essence $957,600. That’s like having a $957,600 annuity. But you don’t have your legs below the knee, and you’re missing a hand. If you’re killed in combat, your whole life is only worth about $400,000. If you only sacrifice 3 limbs, you can easily double that. VA and military math are very funny things. #va #vascandal #ericshinseki #war #trauma #thisishowmuchyouareworthtoyourcountry
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This is how much you’re worth to your country.

andrewwadenunn:

If you have ever wondered how much your extremities are worth. Some of it doesn’t even sound all that bad…
Say you live to be 80 years old and lose both of your legs below the knee and one hand at 24 years of age, at $1,400 a month, that comes out to be in essence $957,600. That’s like having a $957,600 annuity. But you don’t have your legs below the knee, and you’re missing a hand.
If you’re killed in combat, your whole life is only worth about $400,000. If you only sacrifice 3 limbs, you can easily double that. VA and military math are very funny things.
#va #vascandal #ericshinseki #war #trauma #thisishowmuchyouareworthtoyourcountry

Never Forget Friday.
"If I call you BROTHER, it’s because you’ve earned my RESPECT."Join OEW’s team in raising awareness of the enduring nature of wounded veterans. For more information on how you can help, go to www.enduringwarrior.org High-res

Never Forget Friday.

"If I call you BROTHER, it’s because you’ve earned my RESPECT."

Join OEW’s team in raising awareness of the enduring nature of wounded veterans. 
For more information on how you can help, go to www.enduringwarrior.org

Never forgotten, honored always.

The OEW team with wounded veteran honorees Tito Pineiro and Scott Casmiro are officially out of the starting blocks and on the Ultimate Challenge Mud Run course, 12 APR 2014.

2 Year Army Veteran SFC Tito Pineiro is a 12B Combat Engineer with the 82nd ABN who is Airborne, Ranger, and Sapper qualified. In his selfless career, SFC Pineiro has deployed three times in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, two in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, and twice in support of tours in Southern Africa. In SFC Pineiro’s career, he has been awarded the Purple Heart five times, and from his combat wounds, suffers from Post Traumatic Stress and Traumatic Brain Injury. Tito resides in Fayetteville NC with his wife Nina, his daughter Ashlyn, and his son Tristan. Tito still continues to serve today with the 82nd ABN.

Sgt Casimiro enlisted as a 0331 Machine Gunner in the United States Marine Corps in 2007. Stationed in Camp Pendleton, CA, Norfolk, VA and Camp Lejeune, NC. While conducting combat operations during his third deployment in Afghanistan with 1st Battalion 6th Marines Bravo CO, Sgt. Casimiro was wounded by an IED and awarded the Purple Heart November 10, 2011. Sgt. Casimiro is now retired and married to Rebekah Casimiro, and they are expecting their first child, Harper E. Casimiro in May 2014. Sgt. Casimiro is also employed with the VA in Columbia, South Carolina as a Certified Peer Support Specialist (Counselor) in the Mental Health Department.

SOLDIER STORIES: Farrell’s Fight, Fin.

Farrell Gilliam was buried in Fresno Jan. 21, carried to his grave by Marine pallbearers and friends.

(Article by Gretel C. Kovach, 28 MAR 2014 in UT San Diego. Source.)

He rarely spoke of it. Not to his family or best buddies, fellow Marines or medical staff watching over him. 

But Cpl. Farrell Gilliam had endured far more by the age 25 than most people could comprehend.

The Camp Pendleton infantryman survived three months of combat in 2010 with the “Darkhorse” 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment in Sangin, Afghanistan — one of the deadliest battlegrounds of the war.

Amid firefights and insurgents’ bombs, Gilliam saw limbs strewn across the ground. He loaded broken, bleeding bodies for medical evacuation, and grieved for the friends they could not save.

Gilliam’s tour ended early when his legs were blown off by an improvised explosive device, or IED. “Farrell’s Fight,” his struggle on the homefront that his big brother helped him chronicle online, included more than 30 surgeries and three years of rehabilitation.

It was a story of triumph over wounds that would have been fatal in earlier conflicts. A story that was coming to an end, but not how anyone who knew him expected.

Gilliam was months away from a medical discharge from the Marine Corps and a new life as civilian college student. Physically, he had one surgery left to remove hardware in an arm. Psychologically, he was suffering from invisible wounds he hid behind smiles and upbeat banter.

Or so his family discovered on Jan. 9, when Gilliam committed suicide by shooting himself in the head in his barracks room in San Antonio.