Showing 11 posts tagged RAF

Fast friends.

defencehq:

Images of a Royal Air Force Typhoon from No 1 (Fighter) Squadron and a French Air Force Mirage 2000N practising their formation flying skills [Pictures: Sergeant Ralph Merry ABIPP RAF, Crown copyright]
 
British and French jets have been practising their flying skills in the skies above northern England as part of Exercise Capable Eagle.
 
State-of-the-art RAF Typhoons and French Air Force Mirages were involved in the air component of Exercise Joint Warrior, a twice-yearly, multinational, tri-service military exercise, one of the biggest of its kind in Europe.
 
Read more: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/air-forces-take-to-the-skies

Red Diamond.
defencehq:

For the first time since 2011, their iconic diamond 9 formation was back in the skies over Lincolnshire as the Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, the Red Arrows, practised for their 2013 display season.
The team are pleased to report that the practice went extremely well, demonstrating the professionalism and precision for which the the Red Arrows have become renowned around the world.
High-res

Red Diamond.

defencehq:

For the first time since 2011, their iconic diamond 9 formation was back in the skies over Lincolnshire as the Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, the Red Arrows, practised for their 2013 display season.

The team are pleased to report that the practice went extremely well, demonstrating the professionalism and precision for which the the Red Arrows have become renowned around the world.

Passing gas.
An A-10 Thunderbolt II from Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, flies in to receive fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 100th Air Refueling Wing, RAF Mildenhall, England, over Germany. The 100th ARW refuels aircraft throughout Europe, Africa and Southwest Asia.
(Photo by Tech. Sgt. Latisha Cole, 8 NOV 2012.)
[I needed hawgporn this evening. Heard them flying over en route to the live fire range this morning. Wish they hadn’t reassigned PAANG’s squadron to Maryland. I miss them. -R] High-res

Passing gas.

An A-10 Thunderbolt II from Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, flies in to receive fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 100th Air Refueling Wing, RAF Mildenhall, England, over Germany. The 100th ARW refuels aircraft throughout Europe, Africa and Southwest Asia.

(Photo by Tech. Sgt. Latisha Cole, 8 NOV 2012.)

[I needed hawgporn this evening. Heard them flying over en route to the live fire range this morning. Wish they hadn’t reassigned PAANG’s squadron to Maryland. I miss them. -R]

Red Arrow Hawks.
The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team ‘Red Arrows’ amaze thousands of spectators with an aerial demonstration during the Farnborough International Air Show in Farnborough, England. More than 250,000 trade and public visitors attend the bi-annual event.
The RAF Red Arrows fly a modified BAE Hawk T1 with an uprated engine. The T1 is a single-engine jet trainer aircraft and is also employed by the air forces of India, Finland, and Australia.
(Photo by Tech Sergeant Lee Osberry, 15 July 2012 via DVIDS.) High-res

Red Arrow Hawks.

The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team ‘Red Arrows’ amaze thousands of spectators with an aerial demonstration during the Farnborough International Air Show in Farnborough, England. More than 250,000 trade and public visitors attend the bi-annual event.

The RAF Red Arrows fly a modified BAE Hawk T1 with an uprated engine. The T1 is a single-engine jet trainer aircraft and is also employed by the air forces of India, Finland, and Australia.

(Photo by Tech Sergeant Lee Osberry, 15 July 2012 via DVIDS.)

The 5 of Spades.
Because I’m such a MARC geek, and the previously posted images made me laugh — and wonder what aircraft that was.
Going to wager it’s RAF (Royal Air Force) but the tail insignia is not immediately familiar.
And because I’m such a geek, hi-res sketches of the above card’s images:
High-res

The 5 of Spades.

Because I’m such a MARC geek, and the previously posted images made me laugh — and wonder what aircraft that was.

Going to wager it’s RAF (Royal Air Force) but the tail insignia is not immediately familiar.

And because I’m such a geek, hi-res sketches of the above card’s images:

The Nimrod.
Ugly ass aircraft. Another reason why Google + procrastination = the bane of my existence.
From Wiki, the Repository of All Knowledge:

The Hawker Siddeley Nimrod was a military aircraft developed and built in the United Kingdom. It is an extensive modification of the de Havilland Comet, the world’s first jet airliner. It was originally designed by de Havilland's successor, Hawker Siddeley, now part of BAE Systems.
It was designed as a Royal Air Force maritime patrol aircraft, the Nimrod MR1/MR2, its major role being anti-submarine warfare (ASW), although it also had secondary roles in maritime surveillance and anti-surface warfare. It served from the early 1970s until March 2010.[2] The current Nimrod series was due to be replaced by the now cancelled Nimrod MRA4.[3]
In addition to the three Maritime Reconnaissance variants, two further Nimrod types were developed. The RAF also used the Nimrod R1 variant in an electronic intelligence gathering (ELINT) role, while the Nimrod AEW3 was intended as a dedicated airborne early warning platform in the early to mid 1980s; this was unsuccessful and was cancelled in 1986 in favour of the Boeing E-3 Sentry.

Whatever. It’s still Fugly. I’ll have this visual in my head next time I call someone a Nimrod, too. High-res

The Nimrod.

Ugly ass aircraft. Another reason why Google + procrastination = the bane of my existence.

From Wiki, the Repository of All Knowledge:

The Hawker Siddeley Nimrod was a military aircraft developed and built in the United Kingdom. It is an extensive modification of the de Havilland Comet, the world’s first jet airliner. It was originally designed by de Havilland's successor, Hawker Siddeley, now part of BAE Systems.

It was designed as a Royal Air Force maritime patrol aircraft, the Nimrod MR1/MR2, its major role being anti-submarine warfare (ASW), although it also had secondary roles in maritime surveillance and anti-surface warfare. It served from the early 1970s until March 2010.[2] The current Nimrod series was due to be replaced by the now cancelled Nimrod MRA4.[3]

In addition to the three Maritime Reconnaissance variants, two further Nimrod types were developed. The RAF also used the Nimrod R1 variant in an electronic intelligence gathering (ELINT) role, while the Nimrod AEW3 was intended as a dedicated airborne early warning platform in the early to mid 1980s; this was unsuccessful and was cancelled in 1986 in favour of the Boeing E-3 Sentry.

Whatever. It’s still Fugly. I’ll have this visual in my head next time I call someone a Nimrod, too.


Sgt. David Smitt, Task Force Destiny, 101st CAB, Pathfinder Team One, A team leader, maintains overwatch during a joint air assault dismount patrol with gunners from the British RAF Regiment’s 15th Squadron in Kandahar province. During patrol, the element moved through the village of Nevay Deh and met with local village elders to address some of their concerns.
(U.S. Army Photo by Task Force Destiny Public Affairs Officer Sadie Bleistein/Released)
I wonder how many archaeological sites have been destroyed in the past ten years. The past fifty, the past hundred. This isn’t Afghanistan’s first war. Or second. -R High-res

Sgt. David Smitt, Task Force Destiny, 101st CAB, Pathfinder Team One, A team leader, maintains overwatch during a joint air assault dismount patrol with gunners from the British RAF Regiment’s 15th Squadron in Kandahar province. During patrol, the element moved through the village of Nevay Deh and met with local village elders to address some of their concerns.

(U.S. Army Photo by Task Force Destiny Public Affairs Officer Sadie Bleistein/Released)

I wonder how many archaeological sites have been destroyed in the past ten years. The past fifty, the past hundred. This isn’t Afghanistan’s first war. Or second. -R