Obama activates Reserves for Operation United Assistance.
One of four MV-22 Ospreys from the Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force Crises Response 14-2, out of Moron, Spain, stands silhouetted by Liberia’s skyline in after landing at Roberts Airfield, Liberia. The MV-22’s will greatly increase USAID and the military’s ability to move supplies and construction materials around Liberia. The U.S. Agency for International Development is the lead U.S. government organization for Operation United Assistance. U.S. Africa Command is supporting the effort by providing command and control, logistics, training and engineering assets to contain the Ebola virus outbreak in West African nations.
(U.S. Army Africa USARAF photo by Sgt. 1st Class Will Patterson, 9 OCT 2014. Article by Nick Simeone, DoD News, Defense Media Activity, 17 OCT 2014.)
President Barack Obama has authorized the Defense Department to call up a small number of National Guard or reserve troops that possess special skills needed to aid efforts in stopping the spread of the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa.
Obama issued an executive order yesterday authorizing the secretaries of Defense and Homeland Security to order the Selected Reserve and certain members of the Individual Ready Reserve to deploy to West Africa, where as many as 4,000 U.S. troops are headed, most of them to Liberia, to support U.S. and international efforts to stop the rapidly spreading virus that has killed nearly 4,500 people.
U.S. officials say Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel requested the order after determining that specialists with skill sets needed by Operation United Assistance, including engineers, comptrollers and religious specialists, were in short supply, or to replace active-duty personnel.
Already, elements of the Kentucky Air National Guard are in Dakar, Senegal, to establish a staging base for the Liberia-based mission, having volunteered and deployed before the presidential order was issued. High-res

Obama activates Reserves for Operation United Assistance.

One of four MV-22 Ospreys from the Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force Crises Response 14-2, out of Moron, Spain, stands silhouetted by Liberia’s skyline in after landing at Roberts Airfield, Liberia. The MV-22’s will greatly increase USAID and the military’s ability to move supplies and construction materials around Liberia. The U.S. Agency for International Development is the lead U.S. government organization for Operation United Assistance. U.S. Africa Command is supporting the effort by providing command and control, logistics, training and engineering assets to contain the Ebola virus outbreak in West African nations.

(U.S. Army Africa USARAF photo by Sgt. 1st Class Will Patterson, 9 OCT 2014. Article by Nick Simeone, DoD News, Defense Media Activity, 17 OCT 2014.)

President Barack Obama has authorized the Defense Department to call up a small number of National Guard or reserve troops that possess special skills needed to aid efforts in stopping the spread of the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa.

Obama issued an executive order yesterday authorizing the secretaries of Defense and Homeland Security to order the Selected Reserve and certain members of the Individual Ready Reserve to deploy to West Africa, where as many as 4,000 U.S. troops are headed, most of them to Liberia, to support U.S. and international efforts to stop the rapidly spreading virus that has killed nearly 4,500 people.

U.S. officials say Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel requested the order after determining that specialists with skill sets needed by Operation United Assistance, including engineers, comptrollers and religious specialists, were in short supply, or to replace active-duty personnel.

Already, elements of the Kentucky Air National Guard are in Dakar, Senegal, to establish a staging base for the Liberia-based mission, having volunteered and deployed before the presidential order was issued.

US Navy identifies Marine declared lost at sea.
(From a U.S. Naval Forces Central Command News Release, 4 OCT 2014)
U.S. Naval Forces Central Command announced yesterday the death of a Marine supporting operations in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit as part of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group.
Marine Corps Cpl. Jordan L. Spears, 21, of Memphis, Indiana, was lost at sea Oct. 1, 2014, in the North Persian Gulf. He was assigned to Marine Tiltrotor Squadron 163, Marine Aircraft Group 16, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California.
U.S. forces in the North Persian Gulf suspended a search and rescue operation for Spears Oct. 2, after efforts to locate him were unsuccessful.
Spears went into the water Oct. 1 when the aircraft he was aboard, a U.S. Marine Corps MV-22B Osprey, appeared to lose power and descended to the surface of the ocean shortly after takeoff from the USS Makin Island. Another air crewman also exited the aircraft at the same time and was safely recovered. He is in stable condition aboard the Makin Island.
The pilot of the aircraft was eventually able to regain control and safely land back aboard Makin Island. There were four personnel aboard the aircraft when it took off, two pilots and two enlisted aircrew. Spears was one of the two enlisted aircrew who exited the aircraft when it appeared the Osprey might crash into the ocean.
U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard personnel conducted an extensive search of the area using all available assets, which continued throughout the night of Oct. 1, and into the next day.
The Osprey’s crew was participating in flight operations in support of its current mission at the time of the mishap.
The US Navy and Marine Corps will investigate the cause of the incident.
USS Makin Island, with embarked elements of the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit, is currently on a scheduled deployment to the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility, where it is supporting operations in Iraq and Syria and throughout the region. 
Related Articles:Search-and-Rescue Operations End for Aircrew MemberSearch Underway for Missing Troop in Persian Gulf High-res

US Navy identifies Marine declared lost at sea.

(From a U.S. Naval Forces Central Command News Release, 4 OCT 2014)

U.S. Naval Forces Central Command announced yesterday the death of a Marine supporting operations in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit as part of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group.

Marine Corps Cpl. Jordan L. Spears, 21, of Memphis, Indiana, was lost at sea Oct. 1, 2014, in the North Persian Gulf. He was assigned to Marine Tiltrotor Squadron 163, Marine Aircraft Group 16, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California.

U.S. forces in the North Persian Gulf suspended a search and rescue operation for Spears Oct. 2, after efforts to locate him were unsuccessful.

Spears went into the water Oct. 1 when the aircraft he was aboard, a U.S. Marine Corps MV-22B Osprey, appeared to lose power and descended to the surface of the ocean shortly after takeoff from the USS Makin Island. Another air crewman also exited the aircraft at the same time and was safely recovered. He is in stable condition aboard the Makin Island.

The pilot of the aircraft was eventually able to regain control and safely land back aboard Makin Island. There were four personnel aboard the aircraft when it took off, two pilots and two enlisted aircrew. Spears was one of the two enlisted aircrew who exited the aircraft when it appeared the Osprey might crash into the ocean.

U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard personnel conducted an extensive search of the area using all available assets, which continued throughout the night of Oct. 1, and into the next day.

The Osprey’s crew was participating in flight operations in support of its current mission at the time of the mishap.

The US Navy and Marine Corps will investigate the cause of the incident.

USS Makin Island, with embarked elements of the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit, is currently on a scheduled deployment to the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility, where it is supporting operations in Iraq and Syria and throughout the region. 

Related Articles:
Search-and-Rescue Operations End for Aircrew Member
Search Underway for Missing Troop in Persian Gulf

They had no choice.
georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

USMC war dog “Caesar von Steuben” is x-rayed by Navy corpsmen after being wounded on patrol during the fight for Bougainville. 
As with most of the dogs that fought with the United States military in World War II, the three year old German shepherd had been a civilian, owned by a family in the Bronx who volunteered him for service, one of thousands of families to offer their pet up for the war effort.
Only a select few were accepted into service, and even then they would undergo rigorous training to prepare them for life in the combat zone. In total, 1,074 dogs were ‘enlisted’ in the Marine Corps, and 29 would die in combat, along with just under 200 fatalities from disease or accidents. After the war, an outcry ended plans to euthanize the remaining veteran animals, and instead they were put through demilitarization training, with almost universal success. Many were returned to their families, although in more than a few cases, the Marine handler would bring the dog back to civilian life with him.
In Caesar’s case, he recovered from his wound quickly, and he received an official commendation for his communication runs prior to his wounding, including completing his ninth and final one while injured. Returned to service however, he would be killed in combat while fighting on Okinawa in 1945.
(National Archives)

[Inscription from the Animals in War Memorial located outside Hyde Park, London.] High-res

They had no choice.

georgy-konstantinovich-zhukov:

USMC war dog “Caesar von Steuben” is x-rayed by Navy corpsmen after being wounded on patrol during the fight for Bougainville. 

As with most of the dogs that fought with the United States military in World War II, the three year old German shepherd had been a civilian, owned by a family in the Bronx who volunteered him for service, one of thousands of families to offer their pet up for the war effort.

Only a select few were accepted into service, and even then they would undergo rigorous training to prepare them for life in the combat zone. In total, 1,074 dogs were ‘enlisted’ in the Marine Corps, and 29 would die in combat, along with just under 200 fatalities from disease or accidents. After the war, an outcry ended plans to euthanize the remaining veteran animals, and instead they were put through demilitarization training, with almost universal success. Many were returned to their families, although in more than a few cases, the Marine handler would bring the dog back to civilian life with him.

In Caesar’s case, he recovered from his wound quickly, and he received an official commendation for his communication runs prior to his wounding, including completing his ninth and final one while injured. Returned to service however, he would be killed in combat while fighting on Okinawa in 1945.

(National Archives)

[Inscription from the Animals in War Memorial located outside Hyde Park, London.]

Shrapnel, dirt and stone transformed.

U.S. Marine Cpl. Ryan Hamman, a vehicle commander with Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 2d Marine Regiment, provides security for Marines as they return from loading an injured linguist onto a DUSTOFF UH-60 Black Hawk for medevac during a security patrol in Helmand province, Afghanistan. Patrols are conducted to disrupt enemy operations against the Bastion-Leatherneck Complex.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. John A. Martinez Jr, 24 AUG 2014.)

USMC Sergeant Charles C. Strong. 15 SEP 2014.

Died in Herat province, Afghanistan while conducting combat operations when an individual wearing an Afghan National Army uniform turned his weapon against ISAF members. Strong was assigned to 2nd Marine Special Operations Battalion, Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command out of Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

Afghan and ISAF officials are reviewing the incident. 

The Percheron of rotary wings.
Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 26, 2nd Marine Logistics Group prepare to connect a metal beam to a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter during external lift training aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. Marines with Helicopter Support Team, CLB-26 partnered with Marine Heavy Helicopter Training Squadron 302, Marine Aircraft Group 29, 2nd Marine Air Wing, to practice single and dual point cargo lifts.
(Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Preston McDonald, 27 AUG 2014.) High-res

The Percheron of rotary wings.

Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 26, 2nd Marine Logistics Group prepare to connect a metal beam to a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter during external lift training aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. Marines with Helicopter Support Team, CLB-26 partnered with Marine Heavy Helicopter Training Squadron 302, Marine Aircraft Group 29, 2nd Marine Air Wing, to practice single and dual point cargo lifts.

(Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Preston McDonald, 27 AUG 2014.)

Where lightning leads, thunder follows.
Marines with Company F, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, fire a spotting round with a MK153 SMAW during a live fire range at Camp Pendleton, California. Spotting rounds allow the gunner to engage targets effectively before following up with a rocket and hitting the objective. The Marines performed rocket drills to sustain their operational abilities.
(Photo by Lance Corporal William Perkins, 21 AUG 2014.) High-res

Where lightning leads, thunder follows.

Marines with Company F, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, fire a spotting round with a MK153 SMAW during a live fire range at Camp Pendleton, California. Spotting rounds allow the gunner to engage targets effectively before following up with a rocket and hitting the objective. The Marines performed rocket drills to sustain their operational abilities.

(Photo by Lance Corporal William Perkins, 21 AUG 2014.)

A new breed of operator.
Marine Special Operations Officers (SOOs) graduating MARSOC’s ITC will be assigned a new Primary Military Occupational Specialty, clearing the way for retention and promotion in a professional career path.
Previously, only enlisted Marines designated as Critical Skills Operators (CSOs) were awarded a PMOS of 0372, while SOOs were awarded an Additional Military Occupational Specialty of 0370. The decision now allows SOOs to hold 0370 as a PMOS, and be managed with a development strategy that facilitates talent management of Special Operations Forces skills, standardized training, retention, promotions, command, professional military education and career progression, according to Maj. Gen Clark, the MARSOC commander.“Approval of the PMOS allows the Marine Corps the ability to develop Marine Special Operations Officers (SOOs), over a course of a career, as both fully proficient special operations professionals and well-rounded Marine Corps Air-Ground Task Force officers,” said Clark. High-res

A new breed of operator.

Marine Special Operations Officers (SOOs) graduating MARSOC’s ITC will be assigned a new Primary Military Occupational Specialty, clearing the way for retention and promotion in a professional career path.

Previously, only enlisted Marines designated as Critical Skills Operators (CSOs) were awarded a PMOS of 0372, while SOOs were awarded an Additional Military Occupational Specialty of 0370. The decision now allows SOOs to hold 0370 as a PMOS, and be managed with a development strategy that facilitates talent management of Special Operations Forces skills, standardized training, retention, promotions, command, professional military education and career progression, according to Maj. Gen Clark, the MARSOC commander.“Approval of the PMOS allows the Marine Corps the ability to develop Marine Special Operations Officers (SOOs), over a course of a career, as both fully proficient special operations professionals and well-rounded Marine Corps Air-Ground Task Force officers,” said Clark.