USMC Sergeant Charles C. Strong. 15 SEP 2014.

Died in Herat province, Afghanistan while conducting combat operations when an individual wearing an Afghan National Army uniform turned his weapon against ISAF members. Strong was assigned to 2nd Marine Special Operations Battalion, Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command out of Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

Afghan and ISAF officials are reviewing the incident. 

The Percheron of rotary wings.
Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 26, 2nd Marine Logistics Group prepare to connect a metal beam to a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter during external lift training aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. Marines with Helicopter Support Team, CLB-26 partnered with Marine Heavy Helicopter Training Squadron 302, Marine Aircraft Group 29, 2nd Marine Air Wing, to practice single and dual point cargo lifts.
(Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Preston McDonald, 27 AUG 2014.) High-res

The Percheron of rotary wings.

Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 26, 2nd Marine Logistics Group prepare to connect a metal beam to a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter during external lift training aboard Camp Lejeune, N.C. Marines with Helicopter Support Team, CLB-26 partnered with Marine Heavy Helicopter Training Squadron 302, Marine Aircraft Group 29, 2nd Marine Air Wing, to practice single and dual point cargo lifts.

(Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Preston McDonald, 27 AUG 2014.)

Where lightning leads, thunder follows.
Marines with Company F, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, fire a spotting round with a MK153 SMAW during a live fire range at Camp Pendleton, California. Spotting rounds allow the gunner to engage targets effectively before following up with a rocket and hitting the objective. The Marines performed rocket drills to sustain their operational abilities.
(Photo by Lance Corporal William Perkins, 21 AUG 2014.) High-res

Where lightning leads, thunder follows.

Marines with Company F, 2nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, fire a spotting round with a MK153 SMAW during a live fire range at Camp Pendleton, California. Spotting rounds allow the gunner to engage targets effectively before following up with a rocket and hitting the objective. The Marines performed rocket drills to sustain their operational abilities.

(Photo by Lance Corporal William Perkins, 21 AUG 2014.)

A new breed of operator.
Marine Special Operations Officers (SOOs) graduating MARSOC’s ITC will be assigned a new Primary Military Occupational Specialty, clearing the way for retention and promotion in a professional career path.
Previously, only enlisted Marines designated as Critical Skills Operators (CSOs) were awarded a PMOS of 0372, while SOOs were awarded an Additional Military Occupational Specialty of 0370. The decision now allows SOOs to hold 0370 as a PMOS, and be managed with a development strategy that facilitates talent management of Special Operations Forces skills, standardized training, retention, promotions, command, professional military education and career progression, according to Maj. Gen Clark, the MARSOC commander.“Approval of the PMOS allows the Marine Corps the ability to develop Marine Special Operations Officers (SOOs), over a course of a career, as both fully proficient special operations professionals and well-rounded Marine Corps Air-Ground Task Force officers,” said Clark. High-res

A new breed of operator.

Marine Special Operations Officers (SOOs) graduating MARSOC’s ITC will be assigned a new Primary Military Occupational Specialty, clearing the way for retention and promotion in a professional career path.

Previously, only enlisted Marines designated as Critical Skills Operators (CSOs) were awarded a PMOS of 0372, while SOOs were awarded an Additional Military Occupational Specialty of 0370. The decision now allows SOOs to hold 0370 as a PMOS, and be managed with a development strategy that facilitates talent management of Special Operations Forces skills, standardized training, retention, promotions, command, professional military education and career progression, according to Maj. Gen Clark, the MARSOC commander.“Approval of the PMOS allows the Marine Corps the ability to develop Marine Special Operations Officers (SOOs), over a course of a career, as both fully proficient special operations professionals and well-rounded Marine Corps Air-Ground Task Force officers,” said Clark.

We rock the body, rock the body…
U.S. Marines, with India Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, practice clearing rooms with multiple entrances at Range 8C’s “Shoot House” during the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Exercise 2014. RIMPAC trains and improves leadership at all levels, including individual proficiency, and sharpens command and control skills while challenging participants to adapt to changing conditions as part of a joint or combined force.
(Photo by Lance Corporal Wesley Timm, 22 JUL 2014. Title lyrics from "Bodyrock" by Moby.) High-res

We rock the body, rock the body…

U.S. Marines, with India Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, practice clearing rooms with multiple entrances at Range 8C’s “Shoot House” during the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Exercise 2014. RIMPAC trains and improves leadership at all levels, including individual proficiency, and sharpens command and control skills while challenging participants to adapt to changing conditions as part of a joint or combined force.

(Photo by Lance Corporal Wesley Timm, 22 JUL 2014. Title lyrics from "Bodyrock" by Moby.)

SOLDIER STORIES: Martial arts instructor teaches with passion.
(Article by Air Force Staff Sgt. Leslie Keopka, Combined Joint Task Force Horn of Africa, 18 JUL 2014.)
CAMP LEMONNIER, Djibouti - Street lights shine down on a tent in a turf field as Marines of all ranks gather inside, night after night, to learn crucial skills that could someday save their lives.
These Marines not only are learning important martial arts tactics, but also are learning how to be martial arts instructors.
"One mind, any weapon," is the motto for the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, meaning that a Marine is a weapon, even without carrying one.
Marine Corps Sgt. Lawanda Ruiz, administration chief for the Combined Joint Task Force Horn of Africa personnel office here, has dedicated more than 400 hours as an MCMAP instructor trainer, both here and at her home station of Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.
The martial arts program combines mental, physical and character discipline. Marines must have a balance of honor, courage, commitment, professional military education, determination, and physical and mental strength, Ruiz said.
Ruiz, a native of Anniston, Alabama, graduated seven new instructors last month. The course was three weeks long, six days a week, and its 120 hours of instruction covered tactics, nutrition and Marine Corps history.
"The thing that we wanted to do during the Martial Arts Instructors Course was let everyone get away from the mixed martial arts mindset and put it into a combat mindset — full fighting gear," Ruiz said. "Utilizing this course, I was able to show the Marines that regardless of their job, they might be called upon to take charge and ensure the safety of military, diplomatic and civilian personnel."
Ruiz completed the seven-week Marine Corps Center of Excellence Instructor Trainer’s Course in March. This was the first class she taught alone.
She said couldn’t have done so well without the support of the combined joint task force staff here and her husband, Marine Corps Sgt. Carlos Ruiz, Marine Corps Security Force Regiment, Chesapeake, Virginia, and a 2nd-degree black belt Marine Corps Martial Arts Program instructor trainer.
"My husband got me into the program; he gave me motivation and encouraged me to go to the instructor course," Ruiz said. "I looked to him, and he helped me so much with this first course. I was calling him every day saying, ‘How do I do this? What would be the best way?’"
When Ruiz finishes her deployment, she will transfer to the Martial Arts Center of Excellence headquarters in Quantico, Virginia, where she will be a full-time instructor trainer.
"I want to show people the positives of MCMAP," she said. "I want them to tie MCMAP in with their careers, their lives, and use it to help make them be a better man or woman. I just want to be able to say that I gave every student my all."
Related Sites:Combined Joint Task Force Horn of Africa U.S. Africa CommandSpecial Report: U.S. Africa Command High-res

SOLDIER STORIES: Martial arts instructor teaches with passion.

(Article by Air Force Staff Sgt. Leslie Keopka, Combined Joint Task Force Horn of Africa, 18 JUL 2014.)

CAMP LEMONNIER, Djibouti - Street lights shine down on a tent in a turf field as Marines of all ranks gather inside, night after night, to learn crucial skills that could someday save their lives.

These Marines not only are learning important martial arts tactics, but also are learning how to be martial arts instructors.

"One mind, any weapon," is the motto for the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, meaning that a Marine is a weapon, even without carrying one.

Marine Corps Sgt. Lawanda Ruiz, administration chief for the Combined Joint Task Force Horn of Africa personnel office here, has dedicated more than 400 hours as an MCMAP instructor trainer, both here and at her home station of Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

The martial arts program combines mental, physical and character discipline. Marines must have a balance of honor, courage, commitment, professional military education, determination, and physical and mental strength, Ruiz said.

Ruiz, a native of Anniston, Alabama, graduated seven new instructors last month. The course was three weeks long, six days a week, and its 120 hours of instruction covered tactics, nutrition and Marine Corps history.

"The thing that we wanted to do during the Martial Arts Instructors Course was let everyone get away from the mixed martial arts mindset and put it into a combat mindset — full fighting gear," Ruiz said. "Utilizing this course, I was able to show the Marines that regardless of their job, they might be called upon to take charge and ensure the safety of military, diplomatic and civilian personnel."

Ruiz completed the seven-week Marine Corps Center of Excellence Instructor Trainer’s Course in March. This was the first class she taught alone.

She said couldn’t have done so well without the support of the combined joint task force staff here and her husband, Marine Corps Sgt. Carlos Ruiz, Marine Corps Security Force Regiment, Chesapeake, Virginia, and a 2nd-degree black belt Marine Corps Martial Arts Program instructor trainer.

"My husband got me into the program; he gave me motivation and encouraged me to go to the instructor course," Ruiz said. "I looked to him, and he helped me so much with this first course. I was calling him every day saying, ‘How do I do this? What would be the best way?’"

When Ruiz finishes her deployment, she will transfer to the Martial Arts Center of Excellence headquarters in Quantico, Virginia, where she will be a full-time instructor trainer.

"I want to show people the positives of MCMAP," she said. "I want them to tie MCMAP in with their careers, their lives, and use it to help make them be a better man or woman. I just want to be able to say that I gave every student my all."

Related Sites:
Combined Joint Task Force Horn of Africa 
U.S. Africa Command
Special Report: U.S. Africa Command

Common virtue.

US Marines of the Drum and Bugle Corps, Silent Drill Platoon, and color guard perform during the Sunset Parade at the Marine Corps War Memorial in Arlington, Virginia. Sunset Parades are held every Tuesday during the summer months.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Tia Dufour, 24 JUN 2014.)

 

Slow is smooth is fast.

US Marines and ROK SEALS fastrope into an urban terrain facility from a MH-60S Seahawk from Helicopter Sea Combat (HSC) Squadron 4 during a special operations forces (SOF) integration as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Exercise 2014. The SOF integration used the combat skills and capabilities of U.S. Marine Special Operations Team 8133, ROK SEALS and Peru Special Forces to take down and capture a high value target.

(Photos by Corporal Matthew Bragg, 10 JUL 2014.)

elkoi:

ioweyouamoffat:

merry-mbembe:

vivelafat:

sleepyassassin:

haytham-senpai:

ikenbot:







cultural appropriation 101







Seriously guys, wearing a war bonnet without having to suffer blood, sweat and tears for it is so disrespectful to all the servicemen who have sacrificed their lives for this country.




Finally someone stands up for my people and puts it into words that i couldn’t. Thank you!!!

I love the smell of cultural sensitivity education in the morning.

Those pics are so sweet. <3

I genuinely didn’t know this thank you for educating me

Wow I get it now.
High-res

elkoi:

ioweyouamoffat:

merry-mbembe:

vivelafat:

sleepyassassin:

haytham-senpai:

ikenbot:

cultural appropriation 101

Seriously guys, wearing a war bonnet without having to suffer blood, sweat and tears for it is so disrespectful to all the servicemen who have sacrificed their lives for this country.

Crow ceremony marks Marine's return from Iraq

Crow ceremony marks Marine's return from Iraq

[two+two.jpg]

Finally someone stands up for my people and puts it into words that i couldn’t. Thank you!!!

I love the smell of cultural sensitivity education in the morning.

Those pics are so sweet. <3

I genuinely didn’t know this thank you for educating me

Wow I get it now.

(via shallowthoughtsfromadeepmind)