Stampede.
An “Elephant Walk,” comprising 12 KC-10 Extenders and six C-17 Globemaster IIIs from the 305th Air Mobility Wing, was held as part of a training exercise at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. The exercise enabled aircrew, maintenance, command post and operational support personnel to test their ability to launch a mass amount of aircraft in support of real-world operations. An Elephant Walk is a nose-to-tail taxi formation.
(U.S. Air Force photo by Wayne Russell, 21 NOV 2013.) High-res

Stampede.

An “Elephant Walk,” comprising 12 KC-10 Extenders and six C-17 Globemaster IIIs from the 305th Air Mobility Wing, was held as part of a training exercise at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. The exercise enabled aircrew, maintenance, command post and operational support personnel to test their ability to launch a mass amount of aircraft in support of real-world operations. An Elephant Walk is a nose-to-tail taxi formation.

(U.S. Air Force photo by Wayne Russell, 21 NOV 2013.)

Almost home.
Soldiers await take-off on a C-17 Globemaster III from Bagram Air Field as they complete their tour in Afghanistan, Jan. 29, 2013. The C-17 is the backbone of United States Air Force strategic airlift operations supporting coalition forces in Afghanistan. (U.S. Army photo by 1st Lt. Henry Chan)
[pulled off of a friends FB page——K] High-res

Almost home.

Soldiers await take-off on a C-17 Globemaster III from Bagram Air Field as they complete their tour in Afghanistan, Jan. 29, 2013. The C-17 is the backbone of United States Air Force strategic airlift operations supporting coalition forces in Afghanistan. (U.S. Army photo by 1st Lt. Henry Chan)

[pulled off of a friends FB page——K]

DOD Provides Airlift Support to Algeria Attack Victims

(Article by Amaani Lyle, American Forces Press Service, 22 JAN 2013. Source.)

WASHINGTON - The United States has provided airlift support to the Algerian government in the wake of recent terrorist attacks at a natural gas plant, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little told reporters here today.

Little confirmed that U.S. C-130 and C-17 aircraft configured for medical evacuation support moved wounded Americans and others from Algeria to Naval Air Station Sigonella on the Italian island of Sicily and to Ramstein Air Base, Germany, respectively.

The evacuations occur as the United States maintains participation in international efforts to thwart burgeoning terrorist cells in Northern Africa, Little said.

"The sole blame for what happened at this facility in Algeria rests with the terrorists, … and the responsibility lies with them," he added.

Little noted the United States has seen “strong indications” that Al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb — a Mali-based militant organization — and other northern militant elements had a role in the attacks, but the groups are not solely an American issue.

"Countries in the region and beyond need to take AQIM very seriously," Little said. "This node has grown in threat over the years, and we need to do whatever we can to thwart them."

[Somewhere in the #soldierporn archives is a video of the flying hospitals this article references. Two years of archives though… I’ll reblog it when I find it. -R]

Night jump beast.
A U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III conducts air mobility operations at Holland Drop Zone, Fort Bragg, N.C., during Joint Operations Access Exercise 12-02. JOAX is a two-week forcible entry and ground combat exercise to prepare Air Force and Army service members to respond to worldwide crises and contingencies.
(Photo by Tech Sergeant Edward Gyokeres, 7 JUN 2012.) High-res

Night jump beast.

A U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III conducts air mobility operations at Holland Drop Zone, Fort Bragg, N.C., during Joint Operations Access Exercise 12-02. JOAX is a two-week forcible entry and ground combat exercise to prepare Air Force and Army service members to respond to worldwide crises and contingencies.

(Photo by Tech Sergeant Edward Gyokeres, 7 JUN 2012.)

soldierporn:

Sweet Hop Home.
From “Year in Photos, 2008” collection.
The sun sets behind a C-17 Globemaster III as soldiers wait in line to board the aircraft taking them back to the United States at Joint Base Balad, Iraq. C-17s can carry payloads up to 169,000 pounds and can land on small airfields. The C-17 is deployed from the 437th Airlift Wing at Charleston Air Force Base, S.C.
(U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Erik Gudmundson, 17 November 2008 via DVIDS.)
High-res

soldierporn:

Sweet Hop Home.

From “Year in Photos, 2008” collection.

The sun sets behind a C-17 Globemaster III as soldiers wait in line to board the aircraft taking them back to the United States at Joint Base Balad, Iraq. C-17s can carry payloads up to 169,000 pounds and can land on small airfields. The C-17 is deployed from the 437th Airlift Wing at Charleston Air Force Base, S.C.

(U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Erik Gudmundson, 17 November 2008 via DVIDS.)

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Alberto Colon, 27th Engineer Battalion, inspects the troop door of a C-17 Globemaster III before jumping from the aircraft during a mission in support of Joint Operations Access Exercise on Fort Bragg, N.C. JOAX is a two-week exercise to prepare Air Force and Army service members to respond to worldwide crises and contingencies.
(Photo by Staff Sergeant Eric Harris, 8 June 2012 via DVIDS.) High-res

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Alberto Colon, 27th Engineer Battalion, inspects the troop door of a C-17 Globemaster III before jumping from the aircraft during a mission in support of Joint Operations Access Exercise on Fort Bragg, N.C. JOAX is a two-week exercise to prepare Air Force and Army service members to respond to worldwide crises and contingencies.

(Photo by Staff Sergeant Eric Harris, 8 June 2012 via DVIDS.)

A group of U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III aircraft prepare to air drop equipment during the mobility air forces exercise as part of the U.S. Air Force Weapons School on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada.
The Air Force Weapons School is a five-and-a-half-month training course which provides selected officers with the most advanced training in weapons and tactics employment. MAFEX is the culmination exercise for mobility assets participating in the weapons school.
(Photo by Staff Sergeant Eric Harris, 23 May 2012 via DVIDS.) High-res

A group of U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III aircraft prepare to air drop equipment during the mobility air forces exercise as part of the U.S. Air Force Weapons School on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada.

The Air Force Weapons School is a five-and-a-half-month training course which provides selected officers with the most advanced training in weapons and tactics employment. MAFEX is the culmination exercise for mobility assets participating in the weapons school.

(Photo by Staff Sergeant Eric Harris, 23 May 2012 via DVIDS.)

MATV relocation.
A tactical vehicle (M-ATV) is loaded onto a U.S. Air Force C-17 “Globemaster III” cargo plane at the airfield on Forward Operating Base Farah. This marks the first time in over a year that a C-17 has landed at this FOB. The two tactical vehicles were transferred to another unit.
(Photo by Staff Sergeant Jonathan Lovelady, 10 May 2012 via DVIDS.) High-res

MATV relocation.

A tactical vehicle (M-ATV) is loaded onto a U.S. Air Force C-17 “Globemaster III” cargo plane at the airfield on Forward Operating Base Farah. This marks the first time in over a year that a C-17 has landed at this FOB. The two tactical vehicles were transferred to another unit.

(Photo by Staff Sergeant Jonathan Lovelady, 10 May 2012 via DVIDS.)

Well at least they didn’t req an elephant this time.
Critical supplies are delivered to an undisclosed location in Afghanistan via airdrop by a C-17 Globemaster III. The C-17 is one of two aerial resupply platforms utilized by the U.S. Air Forces Air Mobility Division. In 2011 the AMD directed the dropping of over 58,000 bundles comprising more than 80 million pounds of critical supplies to personnel in austere combat outposts.
(Photo by Staff Sergeant Greg Biondo, 4 May 2012 via DVIDS.)
High-res

Well at least they didn’t req an elephant this time.

Critical supplies are delivered to an undisclosed location in Afghanistan via airdrop by a C-17 Globemaster III. The C-17 is one of two aerial resupply platforms utilized by the U.S. Air Forces Air Mobility Division. In 2011 the AMD directed the dropping of over 58,000 bundles comprising more than 80 million pounds of critical supplies to personnel in austere combat outposts.

(Photo by Staff Sergeant Greg Biondo, 4 May 2012 via DVIDS.)