itsramez:

toocatsoriginals:

Ever Wonder Why U.S.Army Helicopters Have Native American Names (Mostly…)?
From Army Aviation Digest - March 1977 - Contest to Name the UH-60, Which Would Become the Blackhawk:
AR 70-28, dated 18 June 1976, specifies that Army aircraft should be given the names of American Indian tribes or chiefs or terms. The name should appeal to the imagination without sacrifice of dignity, and should suggest an aggressive spirit and confidence in the capabilities of the aircraft. The name also should suggest mobility, agility, flexibility, firepower and endurance.For brevity, it is suggested the name consist of only one word. The names given Army aircraft are primarily for use in public releases and other documents as a ready reference but have proven popular among Army personnel. In the past some Army aircraft, such as the 0-1 Bird Dog and OH-23 Ravenwere not given Indian names. In most cases, such aircraft were given their names before the present policy went into effect. These names have not been changed. The last aircraft introduced into the Army without an Indian name is the AH-1G HueyCobra. This aircraft, an outgrowth of the UH-1 Iroquois (Huey), was named by its maker before it was purchased by the Army. When the Army started buying the helicopter the name quickly was shortened by common usage to ” Cobra,” which is descriptive of its impressive fighting ability. The names of fixed and rotary wing Army aircraft are listed below.
ROTARY WINGAH-1 HueyCobraOH-13 SiouxCH-21 ShawneeOH-23 RavenCH-34 ChoctawOH-58 KiowaCH-37 MojaveTH-55 OsageCH-47 ChinookUH-1 IroquoisCH-54 TarheUH-19 ChickasawOH-6 CayuseAH-56 Cheyene
Now you know… and knowing is half the battle.
via The Aviationist

OH-58 Kiowa thats all, they are Angels down range

[List is missing the newest sibling of the bunch: UH-72 Lakota.]

itsramez:

toocatsoriginals:

Ever Wonder Why U.S.Army Helicopters Have Native American Names (Mostly…)?

From Army Aviation Digest - March 1977 - Contest to Name the UH-60, Which Would Become the Blackhawk:

AR 70-28, dated 18 June 1976, specifies that Army aircraft should be given the names of American Indian tribes or chiefs or terms. The name should appeal to the imagination without sacrifice of dignity, and should suggest an aggressive spirit and confidence in the capabilities of the aircraft. The name also should suggest mobility, agility, flexibility, firepower and endurance.For brevity, it is suggested the name consist of only one word. The names given Army aircraft are primarily for use in public releases and other documents as a ready reference but have proven popular among Army personnel. In the past some Army aircraft, such as the 0-1 Bird Dog and OH-23 Ravenwere not given Indian names. In most cases, such aircraft were given their names before the present policy went into effect. These names have not been changed. The last aircraft introduced into the Army without an Indian name is the AH-1G HueyCobra. This aircraft, an outgrowth of the UH-1 Iroquois (Huey), was named by its maker before it was purchased by the Army. When the Army started buying the helicopter the name quickly was shortened by common usage to ” Cobra,” which is descriptive of its impressive fighting ability. The names of fixed and rotary wing Army aircraft are listed below.

ROTARY WING
AH-1 HueyCobra
OH-13 Sioux
CH-21 Shawnee
OH-23 Raven
CH-34 Choctaw
OH-58 Kiowa
CH-37 Mojave
TH-55 Osage
CH-47 Chinook
UH-1 Iroquois
CH-54 Tarhe
UH-19 Chickasaw
OH-6 Cayuse
AH-56 Cheyene

Now you know… and knowing is half the battle.

via The Aviationist

OH-58 Kiowa thats all, they are Angels down range

[List is missing the newest sibling of the bunch: UH-72 Lakota.]

Evening Quickie #soldierporn: Black and gold.
Crew chiefs of the 169th GSAB prepare a CH-47F Chinook before conducting the night portion of the sling load training with the 1569th Transportation Company. 
(Photo by Sgt. Michael K. Selvage, 10th Sustainment Brigade Public Affairs NCO, 30 JUN 2014.) High-res

Evening Quickie #soldierporn: Black and gold.

Crew chiefs of the 169th GSAB prepare a CH-47F Chinook before conducting the night portion of the sling load training with the 1569th Transportation Company. 

(Photo by Sgt. Michael K. Selvage, 10th Sustainment Brigade Public Affairs NCO, 30 JUN 2014.)

Scenic overlook.

An MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to Helicopter Combat Squadron (HSC) 14 flies by Kauaʻi during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Exercise 2014.

 (U.S. Navy photos by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Shannon E. Renfroe, 3 JUL 2014.)

The technical air worthiness authorities of the Department of the Air Force and Department of the Navy have issued a directive to ground the F-35 fleet based on initial findings from the runway fire incident that occurred at Eglin Air Force Base on Monday, June 23.
The root cause of the incident remains under investigation. Additional inspections of F-35 engines have been ordered, and return to flight will be determined based on inspection results and analysis of engineering data. Defense Department leadership supports this prudent approach.
Preparations continue for F-35 participation in international air shows in the United Kingdom, however a final decision will come early next week.

Pentagon Press Secretary Rear Admiral John Kirby, on F-35 Fleet Grounding, 3 JUL 2014. (Source.)

Antics arguing semantics.

U.S. Air Force airman from the 23rd Special Tactics Squadron jump out of the back of a MH-47 Chinook helicopter at Wynnehaven Beach, Florida. The 23rd STS partnered with 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne) to conduct personnel recovery training using alternate infiltration and exfiltration techniques.

The 160th SOAR, also known as “Night Stalkers,” is a special operations force of the U.S. Army that provides helicopter aviation support for general purpose and special operations forces. The 23rd STS performs austere airfield control, terminal attack control, personnel rescue and recovery, assault zone assessment, battlefield trauma care, direct action and special reconnaissance.

(U.S. Air Force photos by Airman 1st Class Christopher Callaway, 9 APR 2013.)

Zorching into your backyard, your friendly neighborhood stalkers.
An EA-6B Prowler attached to the “Garudas” of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 134 prepares to land as two F/A-18E Super Hornets attached to the “Tomcatters” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31 fly by the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). George H.W. Bush is supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility, which includes the Arabian Gulf. Current presence in the Arabian Gulf is in support of efforts to restabilize the government of Iraq.
(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joshua Card, 29 JUN 2014.)
[Of course it’s the Bush. Because Bushes are notorious for the speed of their erections, and the totality of their focus, when Iraq is involved. -R] High-res

Zorching into your backyard, your friendly neighborhood stalkers.

An EA-6B Prowler attached to the “Garudas” of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 134 prepares to land as two F/A-18E Super Hornets attached to the “Tomcatters” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31 fly by the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). George H.W. Bush is supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility, which includes the Arabian Gulf. Current presence in the Arabian Gulf is in support of efforts to restabilize the government of Iraq.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joshua Card, 29 JUN 2014.)

[Of course it’s the Bush. Because Bushes are notorious for the speed of their erections, and the totality of their focus, when Iraq is involved. -R]

Guardian Angel.

A US Army AH-64 Apache gunship provides close air support for Romanian Land Forces during a live fire exercise at the 7th Army Joint Multinational Training Command’s Grafenwoehr Training Area as part of exercise Combined Resolve II.

The exercise is a U.S. Army Europe-directed multinational exercise; including more than 4,000 participants from 15 allied and partner countries. The intent of the exercise is to train and prepare an U.S.-led multinational brigade to interoperate with multiple partner nations and execute unified land operations against a complex threat while improving the combat readiness of all participants.

(U.S. Army photo by Visual Information Specialist Gertrud Zach, 27 JUN 2014 via DVIDS.)

Keeping sharp.

Pararescuemen from the 82nd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron execute fast rope, hoist, and ladder training with the help of HH-60 helicopters from the 303rd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron. 

(Video by Staff Sergeant Zach Vaughn, Djibouti, Africa, 19 APR 2014.)

Evening Quickie #soldierporn: Blackhawk silhouette.
A UH-60 Black Hawk assists in airborne operations near Adazi Training Area. Approximately 600 paratroopers from the 173rd Airborne Brigade have been deployed to Poland, Lithuania, Estonia and Latvia to conduct expanded land force training by demonstrating their commitment to NATO objectives of sustaining interoperability between allied forces.
(U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Sara Marchus, 116 Public Affairs Detachment, 22 JUN 2014.) High-res

Evening Quickie #soldierporn: Blackhawk silhouette.

A UH-60 Black Hawk assists in airborne operations near Adazi Training Area. Approximately 600 paratroopers from the 173rd Airborne Brigade have been deployed to Poland, Lithuania, Estonia and Latvia to conduct expanded land force training by demonstrating their commitment to NATO objectives of sustaining interoperability between allied forces.

(U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Sara Marchus, 116 Public Affairs Detachment, 22 JUN 2014.)

Evening Quickie #soldierporn: Midnight blue.
Aviation mechanics perform maintenance on an F/A-18E Super Hornet from the “Royal Maces” of Strike Fighter Squadron of (VFA) 27 on the flight deck of the U.S. Navy’s forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). George Washington and its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, provide a combat-ready force that protects and defends the collective maritime interest of the U.S. and its allies and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.
(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Benjamin K. Kittleson, 8 JUN 2014.) High-res

Evening Quickie #soldierporn: Midnight blue.

Aviation mechanics perform maintenance on an F/A-18E Super Hornet from the “Royal Maces” of Strike Fighter Squadron of (VFA) 27 on the flight deck of the U.S. Navy’s forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). George Washington and its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, provide a combat-ready force that protects and defends the collective maritime interest of the U.S. and its allies and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Benjamin K. Kittleson, 8 JUN 2014.)