Into the great wide open.

Pilots of the US Air Force Thunderbirds Demonstration Team perform the Five Card Loop during a practice show at Daytona Beach, Florida.
(U.S. Air Force photo Tech. Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez, 9 OCT 2014.) High-res

Into the great wide open.

Pilots of the US Air Force Thunderbirds Demonstration Team perform the Five Card Loop during a practice show at Daytona Beach, Florida.

(U.S. Air Force photo Tech. Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez, 9 OCT 2014.)

Pulling G’s and clouds.
Maj. Blaine Jones, Thunderbird 5 of the US Air Force Thunderbirds Demonstration Team, performs a Max Turn maneuver during a practice show at Daytona Beach, Florida.
(U.S. Air Force photo Tech. Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez, 10 OCT 2014.) High-res

Pulling G’s and clouds.

Maj. Blaine Jones, Thunderbird 5 of the US Air Force Thunderbirds Demonstration Team, performs a Max Turn maneuver during a practice show at Daytona Beach, Florida.

(U.S. Air Force photo Tech. Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez, 10 OCT 2014.)

Hungry Hildisvini.
coffeeandspentbrass:

michell169:

A-10

BRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRTTT

[Those circular dents in the nose just above the GAU-8 are from misses with the refuel boom. The entry port is under the black panel above what looks like an “I” painted in white.] High-res

Hungry Hildisvini.

coffeeandspentbrass:

michell169:

A-10

BRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRTTT

[Those circular dents in the nose just above the GAU-8 are from misses with the refuel boom. The entry port is under the black panel above what looks like an “I” painted in white.]

(via taco-man-andre)

US Navy identifies Marine declared lost at sea.
(From a U.S. Naval Forces Central Command News Release, 4 OCT 2014)
U.S. Naval Forces Central Command announced yesterday the death of a Marine supporting operations in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit as part of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group.
Marine Corps Cpl. Jordan L. Spears, 21, of Memphis, Indiana, was lost at sea Oct. 1, 2014, in the North Persian Gulf. He was assigned to Marine Tiltrotor Squadron 163, Marine Aircraft Group 16, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California.
U.S. forces in the North Persian Gulf suspended a search and rescue operation for Spears Oct. 2, after efforts to locate him were unsuccessful.
Spears went into the water Oct. 1 when the aircraft he was aboard, a U.S. Marine Corps MV-22B Osprey, appeared to lose power and descended to the surface of the ocean shortly after takeoff from the USS Makin Island. Another air crewman also exited the aircraft at the same time and was safely recovered. He is in stable condition aboard the Makin Island.
The pilot of the aircraft was eventually able to regain control and safely land back aboard Makin Island. There were four personnel aboard the aircraft when it took off, two pilots and two enlisted aircrew. Spears was one of the two enlisted aircrew who exited the aircraft when it appeared the Osprey might crash into the ocean.
U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard personnel conducted an extensive search of the area using all available assets, which continued throughout the night of Oct. 1, and into the next day.
The Osprey’s crew was participating in flight operations in support of its current mission at the time of the mishap.
The US Navy and Marine Corps will investigate the cause of the incident.
USS Makin Island, with embarked elements of the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit, is currently on a scheduled deployment to the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility, where it is supporting operations in Iraq and Syria and throughout the region. 
Related Articles:Search-and-Rescue Operations End for Aircrew MemberSearch Underway for Missing Troop in Persian Gulf High-res

US Navy identifies Marine declared lost at sea.

(From a U.S. Naval Forces Central Command News Release, 4 OCT 2014)

U.S. Naval Forces Central Command announced yesterday the death of a Marine supporting operations in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit as part of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group.

Marine Corps Cpl. Jordan L. Spears, 21, of Memphis, Indiana, was lost at sea Oct. 1, 2014, in the North Persian Gulf. He was assigned to Marine Tiltrotor Squadron 163, Marine Aircraft Group 16, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California.

U.S. forces in the North Persian Gulf suspended a search and rescue operation for Spears Oct. 2, after efforts to locate him were unsuccessful.

Spears went into the water Oct. 1 when the aircraft he was aboard, a U.S. Marine Corps MV-22B Osprey, appeared to lose power and descended to the surface of the ocean shortly after takeoff from the USS Makin Island. Another air crewman also exited the aircraft at the same time and was safely recovered. He is in stable condition aboard the Makin Island.

The pilot of the aircraft was eventually able to regain control and safely land back aboard Makin Island. There were four personnel aboard the aircraft when it took off, two pilots and two enlisted aircrew. Spears was one of the two enlisted aircrew who exited the aircraft when it appeared the Osprey might crash into the ocean.

U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard personnel conducted an extensive search of the area using all available assets, which continued throughout the night of Oct. 1, and into the next day.

The Osprey’s crew was participating in flight operations in support of its current mission at the time of the mishap.

The US Navy and Marine Corps will investigate the cause of the incident.

USS Makin Island, with embarked elements of the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit, is currently on a scheduled deployment to the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility, where it is supporting operations in Iraq and Syria and throughout the region. 

Related Articles:
Search-and-Rescue Operations End for Aircrew Member
Search Underway for Missing Troop in Persian Gulf

peerintothepast:

"High Flight"

"Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth, and danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;

Sunward I’ve climbed and joined the tumbling mirth of sun-split clouds -
and done a hundred things you have not dreamed of - wheeled and soared and swung high in the sunlit silence.

Hovering there I’ve chased the shouting wind along and flung my eager craft through footless halls of air.

Up, up the long delirious burning blue
I’ve topped the wind-swept heights with easy grace, where never lark, or even eagle, flew; and, while with silent, lifting mind I’ve trod the high untrespassed sanctity of space, put out my hand and touched the face of God.”

Portions of this lovely poem appear on the headstones of many interred in Arlington National Cemetery, particularly Aviators and Astronauts.

"High Flight" was composed by Pilot Officer John Gillespie Magee, Jr., an American serving with the Royal Canadian Air Force. He was born in Shanghai, China in 1922, the son of missionary parents, Reverend and Mrs. John Gillespie Magee; his father was an American and his mother was originally a British citizen.

He came to the U.S. in 1939 and earned a scholarship to Yale, but in September 1940 he enlisted in the RCAF and was graduated as a pilot. He was sent to England for combat duty in July 1941.

In August and September 1941, Pilot Officer Magee composed High Flight and sent a copy to his parents. Three months later, on December 11, 1941 his Spitfire collided with another plane during a training flight from the airfield near Scopwick, England and Magee, only 19 years of age, crashed to his death.

His remains are buried in the churchyard cemetery at Scopwick, Lincolnshire.

Biography and photo courtesy of the United States Air Force. (via arlingtoncemetery.net)

(via taco-man-andre)

No Photoshop needed.
The U.S. Navy flight demonstration team, the Blue Angels, perform during the Kaneohe Bay Air Show 2010 at Marine Corps Base Hawaii.
(Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Hight, 24 SEP 2010.)
[The clarity of this photo is testament to a quality photographer; demonstration teams are a challenge to photograph, combining distance from target, high speed, timing/position for composition, and often less than optimal lighting conditions. Shots like this one are gems. -R] High-res

No Photoshop needed.

The U.S. Navy flight demonstration team, the Blue Angels, perform during the Kaneohe Bay Air Show 2010 at Marine Corps Base Hawaii.

(Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael Hight, 24 SEP 2010.)

[The clarity of this photo is testament to a quality photographer; demonstration teams are a challenge to photograph, combining distance from target, high speed, timing/position for composition, and often less than optimal lighting conditions. Shots like this one are gems. -R]

ISIS bombed by female UAE fighter pilot.
(Article by Erin McClam, 25 SEP 2014. Source.)
The first female fighter pilot for the United Arab Emirates led the mission when that country joined the United States and other allies in airstrikes against ISIS over Syria earlier this week.
Maj. Mariam Al Mansouri graduated flight school in 2007 and was one of the first three to join the Emirati air force when it admitted women. She flew an F-16 Desert Falcon on Monday night.



“She is a fully qualified, highly trained, combat-ready pilot, and she led the mission,” Yousef Al Otaiba, the Emirati ambassador to the United States, said Thursday on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.”



“Actually, funny story is, the U.S. tanker pilots called in for air refueling and asked for the UAE mission, and when they heard a female voice on the other side, they actually paused for about 20 seconds, radio silence,” he said.
Mansouri, 35, was born in Abu Dhabi and graduated college with a degree in English literature. She told the magazine Deraa Al Watan earlier this year that her love of country and a passion for challenge and competition drew her to aviation.
But she said that she never focused on competing with male pilots: “Competing with oneself,” she told the magazine, “is conducive to continued learning.”
Mansouri served in the Army before enrolling in flight training. She told The National, an English-language Emirati news outlet, in 2008: “A woman’s passion about something will lead her to achieving what she aspires, and that’s why she should pursue her interests.”
“Being in the air force is a responsibility,” she said. “I feel proud, especially that I am part of the first batch. And that encourages me to continue in this field.”
Earlier this year, the Emirati government presented Mansouri the Pride of the Emirates medal for excellence in her field.



The Emirates were among five Arab allies that joined the United States in the first round of airstrikes in Syria to beat back ISIS forces. They were the first to confirm their participation.

Otaiba, the ambassador, told MSNBC that it was imperative for moderate Arab and Muslim countries to step up and say: “This is a threat against us.”
He said the fight comes down to: “Do you want a model or a society that allows women to become ministers in government, female fighter pilots, business executives, artists — or do you want a society where, if a woman doesn’t cover up in public, she’s beaten or she’s lashed or she’s raped. I mean this is ultimately what this breaks down to.”



High-res

ISIS bombed by female UAE fighter pilot.

(Article by Erin McClam, 25 SEP 2014. Source.)

The first female fighter pilot for the United Arab Emirates led the mission when that country joined the United States and other allies in airstrikes against ISIS over Syria earlier this week.

Maj. Mariam Al Mansouri graduated flight school in 2007 and was one of the first three to join the Emirati air force when it admitted women. She flew an F-16 Desert Falcon on Monday night.

“She is a fully qualified, highly trained, combat-ready pilot, and she led the mission,” Yousef Al Otaiba, the Emirati ambassador to the United States, said Thursday on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.”

“Actually, funny story is, the U.S. tanker pilots called in for air refueling and asked for the UAE mission, and when they heard a female voice on the other side, they actually paused for about 20 seconds, radio silence,” he said.

Mansouri, 35, was born in Abu Dhabi and graduated college with a degree in English literature. She told the magazine Deraa Al Watan earlier this year that her love of country and a passion for challenge and competition drew her to aviation.

But she said that she never focused on competing with male pilots: “Competing with oneself,” she told the magazine, “is conducive to continued learning.”

Mansouri served in the Army before enrolling in flight training. She told The National, an English-language Emirati news outlet, in 2008: “A woman’s passion about something will lead her to achieving what she aspires, and that’s why she should pursue her interests.”

“Being in the air force is a responsibility,” she said. “I feel proud, especially that I am part of the first batch. And that encourages me to continue in this field.”

Earlier this year, the Emirati government presented Mansouri the Pride of the Emirates medal for excellence in her field.

The Emirates were among five Arab allies that joined the United States in the first round of airstrikes in Syria to beat back ISIS forces. They were the first to confirm their participation.

Otaiba, the ambassador, told MSNBC that it was imperative for moderate Arab and Muslim countries to step up and say: “This is a threat against us.”

He said the fight comes down to: “Do you want a model or a society that allows women to become ministers in government, female fighter pilots, business executives, artists — or do you want a society where, if a woman doesn’t cover up in public, she’s beaten or she’s lashed or she’s raped. I mean this is ultimately what this breaks down to.”

The sky wasn’t big enough for them all.
An AH-64 Apache from 4th Attack Reconnaissance Battalion, 4th Aviation Regiment, 4th Combat Aviation Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, fires simulation missiles during an aerial gunnery range on Fort Carson, Colorado.
(Photo by Sergeant Jonathan Thibault, 9 SEP 2014. Title lyrics from "Dirty Paws" by Of Monsters and Men.) High-res

The sky wasn’t big enough for them all.

An AH-64 Apache from 4th Attack Reconnaissance Battalion, 4th Aviation Regiment, 4th Combat Aviation Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, fires simulation missiles during an aerial gunnery range on Fort Carson, Colorado.

(Photo by Sergeant Jonathan Thibault, 9 SEP 2014. Title lyrics from "Dirty Paws" by Of Monsters and Men.)