SOLDIER STORIES: Grenadier Guard & Jeet Kune Do Enthusiast
Sergeant Michael Fogg directs fire onto an enemy position in Nad ‘Ali, Afghanistan. Fogg is a full-time infantryman with the Grenadier Guards of 12th Platoon, Inkerman Company, and recently won his first semiprofessional mixed martial arts fight. 
(Photo and story by Corporal Anthony Ward Jr, 19 April 2012 via DVIDS.)
NAD’ALI, Afghanistan — The Mastiff lumbers down the road, dust filling the air as the tires churn into the Earth moving closer and closer to the objective.Nestled inside the belly of the hot vehicle, beneath the protection of four-point harnesses, are five British soldiers. Among that group, sits Sgt. Michael Fogg, a veteran of the war in Afghanistan on his second tour.As an infantryman with the British army’s Grenadier Guards, this is a reality he faces during his daily duties but he also makes time for a passion he loves dearly.“I always wanted to join the army when I was younger,” said Fogg, the Bristol, England born Oxfordshire, England, resident. “Then that sort of fell by the way a little bit my last few years of school.”“I just didn’t do much, I sat at home. I put on quite a lot of weight,” he added.He eventually decided enough was enough and went down to the local recruiter and signed up.It was in the military that he decided to follow a love he had since a child.“I’ve always been interested in martial arts, its always been like a passion,” said Fogg. “When I was younger, I always used to play fight with my friends, it used to get quite rough.”Fogg gives credit to his father for introducing him to a figure who would spawn his love for Jeet Kune Do.“Bruce Lee has always been someone I’ve been interested in,” said Fogg. “My Dad’s quite a spiritual guy and he talked to me about some of the things Bruce Lee had said. I read a little bit more into some of his beliefs and his ways of doing things. Then I found a guy who teaches Jeet Kune Do.”Judo, Tae Kwon Do and boxing are all different types of fighting disciplines he has tried, but once he found Jeet Kune Do it stood above all the rest.“Terry Valler, he’s a brilliant instructor, he started teaching me JKD and the principles of it,” said Fogg. “A lot of people say in JKD you should do this, you should do that, but it’s all concepts of fighting, there is no wrong or right way to do JKD.”“Everybody is different and that just appealed to me the whole individuality of it,” added Fogg.Fogg has been studying JKD for nearly two years and after honing his skills in various other fighting styles he took a step into the ring.“I’ve had one semiprofessional fight which I won in the third round by submission,” said Fogg. “I’m hoping to have another one when I get back home.”Fogg has aspirations of making it big through the use of his JKD in the Octagon and other mixed martial arts arenas.“I’d like to make it professionally,” said Fogg. “In MMA you need such a wide skillset, there are so many ways to win and so many ways to lose. I’m pretty sure I have the ability to make it.” High-res

SOLDIER STORIES: Grenadier Guard & Jeet Kune Do Enthusiast

Sergeant Michael Fogg directs fire onto an enemy position in Nad ‘Ali, Afghanistan. Fogg is a full-time infantryman with the Grenadier Guards of 12th Platoon, Inkerman Company, and recently won his first semiprofessional mixed martial arts fight. 

(Photo and story by Corporal Anthony Ward Jr, 19 April 2012 via DVIDS.)

NAD’ALI, Afghanistan — The Mastiff lumbers down the road, dust filling the air as the tires churn into the Earth moving closer and closer to the objective.

Nestled inside the belly of the hot vehicle, beneath the protection of four-point harnesses, are five British soldiers. Among that group, sits Sgt. Michael Fogg, a veteran of the war in Afghanistan on his second tour.

As an infantryman with the British army’s Grenadier Guards, this is a reality he faces during his daily duties but he also makes time for a passion he loves dearly.

“I always wanted to join the army when I was younger,” said Fogg, the Bristol, England born Oxfordshire, England, resident. “Then that sort of fell by the way a little bit my last few years of school.”

“I just didn’t do much, I sat at home. I put on quite a lot of weight,” he added.

He eventually decided enough was enough and went down to the local recruiter and signed up.

It was in the military that he decided to follow a love he had since a child.

“I’ve always been interested in martial arts, its always been like a passion,” said Fogg. “When I was younger, I always used to play fight with my friends, it used to get quite rough.”

Fogg gives credit to his father for introducing him to a figure who would spawn his love for Jeet Kune Do.

“Bruce Lee has always been someone I’ve been interested in,” said Fogg. “My Dad’s quite a spiritual guy and he talked to me about some of the things Bruce Lee had said. I read a little bit more into some of his beliefs and his ways of doing things. Then I found a guy who teaches Jeet Kune Do.”

Judo, Tae Kwon Do and boxing are all different types of fighting disciplines he has tried, but once he found Jeet Kune Do it stood above all the rest.

“Terry Valler, he’s a brilliant instructor, he started teaching me JKD and the principles of it,” said Fogg. “A lot of people say in JKD you should do this, you should do that, but it’s all concepts of fighting, there is no wrong or right way to do JKD.”

“Everybody is different and that just appealed to me the whole individuality of it,” added Fogg.

Fogg has been studying JKD for nearly two years and after honing his skills in various other fighting styles he took a step into the ring.

“I’ve had one semiprofessional fight which I won in the third round by submission,” said Fogg. “I’m hoping to have another one when I get back home.”

Fogg has aspirations of making it big through the use of his JKD in the Octagon and other mixed martial arts arenas.

“I’d like to make it professionally,” said Fogg. “In MMA you need such a wide skillset, there are so many ways to win and so many ways to lose. I’m pretty sure I have the ability to make it.”

Notes

  1. albertboulton reblogged this from soldierporn
  2. ijustdontknowwhyidoneit reblogged this from soldierporn
  3. splash-over reblogged this from j-wolf-harding
  4. cptncraig reblogged this from operator-as-fuck
  5. blackbeardactual reblogged this from operator-as-fuck
  6. cumsoline reblogged this from attackingastardestroyer and added:
    L85A2? Do not want.
  7. the-weary-traveler reblogged this from operator-as-fuck
  8. thatarmychick reblogged this from operator-as-fuck
  9. operator-as-fuck reblogged this from j-wolf-harding
  10. j-wolf-harding reblogged this from soldierporn and added:
    British Grenadier Guardsmen.
  11. jcrosb94 reblogged this from catrin-has-moved
  12. confirm3dk1ll reblogged this from catrin-has-moved and added:
    Magpul style mag (are those standard issue now?) Daniel defence handgaurd with built in 1913 Picatinny rails, Bipod...
  13. rideoutprotectorsoftherealm reblogged this from catrin-has-moved
  14. catrin-has-moved reblogged this from soldierporn
  15. beautifullybrokeninlove reblogged this from militarywifeandsister
  16. militarywifeandsister reblogged this from soldierporn
  17. thatniggajames reblogged this from soldierporn
  18. greattperhaps reblogged this from soldierporn
  19. 0fficialattila reblogged this from soldierporn
  20. jetlivving reblogged this from soldierporn
  21. echoesofsilencexo reblogged this from soldierporn
  22. soldierporn posted this