The embodiment of warrior ethos.
US Army Captain Jennifer M. Moreno. 6 OCT 2013.Died in Zhari district, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained during an IED attack. Also killed in the incident were Sergeant Patrick Hawkins, Sergeant Joseph Peters, and Private First Class Cody Patterson. 
berserkerjerk:

blinddragonmetalart:




TACOMA, WASH. — In her last moments of life, Army nurse Capt. Jennifer Moreno heard two orders.
One was a call to help a wounded soldier struck by a blast in a booby-trapped killing field at an Afghanistan bomb-making compound.
The other was a command to stay put lest she strike another mine in the bomb belt.
The nurse from Madigan Army Medical Center chose to help the wounded soldier, and gave her life trying.
In the words of her commander, Moreno ran “into hell” to rescue a comrade on the night she was killed. Newly released narratives of the Oct. 5 battle reveal the kind of hell Moreno and dozens of Army special operators found while trying to disrupt a plot to kill civilians in the city of Kandahar.
A total of 12 bombs exploded that night — a chain reaction that took the lives of four U.S. soldiers and wounded at least 25.
The fifth bomb killed Moreno, 25, of San Diego who volunteered for a dangerous assignment supporting special operators in combat.
The 11th bomb wounded three soldiers trying to recover her body.
Moreno is Madigan’s only fatal casualty from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, even though the hospital south of Tacoma has continuously deployed soldiers to medical facilities in combat zones.
Moreno “sacrificed her life so others could live,” her Bronze Star commendation reads.
The News Tribune previously reported Moreno’s death and covered her memorial service at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. But her award commendation, which the newspaper obtained recently, sheds more light on that chaotic day, and on the heroic steps that were taken to honor the Soldiers Creed: “I will never leave a fallen comrade.”
BREAKING UP A PLOT
Moreno is one of only 11 women from Lewis-McChord to die in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and one of only two women from the local base who were commissioned officers when they were killed.
Moreno died with Sgt. Patrick Hawkins and Spc. Cody Patterson of the Georgia-based 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment and special agent Joseph M. Peters of a military police unit based in Italy.
The Army says their sacrifices stymied an attack “that would have resulted in the deaths of unknown multitudes of innocent civilians.” At least two insurgents died in the compound; two of them were wearing suicide vests.
The narratives were written to support military honors several soldiers received for their actions in the fight. Moreno posthumously received a Bronze Star. So did Hawkins and Patterson.
Spc. Samuel Crockett, who survived that bloody day, received a Silver Star for risking his life over a two-hour rescue. He played a key role in recovering Moreno’s body after the 11th blast, and in providing life-saving medical aid to a wounded soldier.
He also set off the 12th and final bomb, but it had a low detonation that did not injure him.
The battle began as the soldiers approached the compound in Kandahar’s Zhari district and called out for its occupants to surrender.
None of the insurgents inside would be taken alive.
WOMAN IN SUICIDE VEST
The first to die was an Afghan woman walking out of the compound wearing a suicide vest.
She detonated the explosive, killing herself, wounding six troops and setting off a second blast nearby. Two soldiers rushing to help troops wounded in the first blast hit the third bomb. A second enemy fighter died in those early blasts, too.
An Afghan insurgent who ran away from the building detonated the fourth explosive, another suicide vest. The bomb killed him and a military working dog named Jani.
Moreno heard a call from a staff sergeant to help a wounded soldier. At the same time, the battle’s ground commander told all of the soldiers to stay where they were.
Her Bronze Star commendation uses dry, formal military language to describe the decision she faced.
"Disregarding her own well-being," it reads, "Moreno unhesitatingly moved to assist (the soldiers) upon realizing the severity of the wounds sustained by her fellow teammates."
"While in transit, Moreno detonated Device No. 5 and was killed in action."
Few could make the same choice.
"None of us would have done what you did, running into hell to save your wounded brothers, knowing full well you probably wouldn’t make it back," the commander of Moreno’s female Special Operations support team in Afghanistan, Capt. Amanda King, later wrote in a eulogy.
'FOLLOW ME'
The battle did not end with Moreno’s sacrifice.
"Follow me," Hawkins told Patterson as they made their move to reach the wounded.
Patterson stepped on a mine, the sixth detonation. He stumbled and hit the seventh, delivering fatal wounds to both him and Hawkins.
Peters, the military police officer, set off explosions No. 8 and No. 9 after working to clear a helicopter landing zone for medical evacuations.
Crockett arrived with a 20-soldier force dispatched to clear the area of mines and rescue the wounded. He was trained for the job as a soldier in a North Carolina-based explosives command.
He cleared space for medics to work on casualties and made his way to isolated Rangers, escorting them through the mine belt to safety. He managed to retrieve Hawkins, the fallen military dog and various pieces of sensitive military equipment without detonating more bombs.
"His focus on retrieving teammates from stranded positions ultimately preserved their lives," his Silver Star commendation reads.
11TH EXPLOSIVE
Moreno’s body remained on the field.
Three soldiers from Crockett’s unit tried to retrieve her, but struck the 11th explosive.
Crockett ran to them, halting at the edge of his cleared path.
He saw his platoon sergeant injured but standing. Crockett guided him back to safe ground.
With no clear path to his two newly wounded teammates, Crockett got down to the ground and swept the earth for mines with his own hands.
He reached a private first class who lost his right leg to the bomb. Crockett applied a tourniquet and “single-handedly dragged him to an area where medics could safely render treatment.”
There was one more injured teammate left to recover from the 11th explosion. Crockett set off the final blast as he stepped to the wounded sergeant.
It didn’t kill him, so he continued with the rescue. He chose a different path, again swept the ground with his hands, and brought his teammate back to safety.
Still, Moreno’s body remained where she fell.
Crockett got as close as he could to the fallen nurse, attached a drag line to her and pulled her to the safe area.
With Moreno recovered, the operators made the call to leave the compound.
Finally, they got out of hell. They did not leave one of their own behind.




Read this.

The embodiment of warrior ethos.

US Army Captain Jennifer M. Moreno. 6 OCT 2013.
Died in Zhari district, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained during an IED attack. Also killed in the incident were Sergeant Patrick Hawkins, Sergeant Joseph Peters, and Private First Class Cody Patterson. 

berserkerjerk:

blinddragonmetalart:

TACOMA, WASH.In her last moments of life, Army nurse Capt. Jennifer Moreno heard two orders.

One was a call to help a wounded soldier struck by a blast in a booby-trapped killing field at an Afghanistan bomb-making compound.

The other was a command to stay put lest she strike another mine in the bomb belt.

The nurse from Madigan Army Medical Center chose to help the wounded soldier, and gave her life trying.

In the words of her commander, Moreno ran “into hell” to rescue a comrade on the night she was killed. Newly released narratives of the Oct. 5 battle reveal the kind of hell Moreno and dozens of Army special operators found while trying to disrupt a plot to kill civilians in the city of Kandahar.

A total of 12 bombs exploded that night — a chain reaction that took the lives of four U.S. soldiers and wounded at least 25.

The fifth bomb killed Moreno, 25, of San Diego who volunteered for a dangerous assignment supporting special operators in combat.

The 11th bomb wounded three soldiers trying to recover her body.

Moreno is Madigan’s only fatal casualty from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, even though the hospital south of Tacoma has continuously deployed soldiers to medical facilities in combat zones.

Moreno “sacrificed her life so others could live,” her Bronze Star commendation reads.

The News Tribune previously reported Moreno’s death and covered her memorial service at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. But her award commendation, which the newspaper obtained recently, sheds more light on that chaotic day, and on the heroic steps that were taken to honor the Soldiers Creed: “I will never leave a fallen comrade.”

BREAKING UP A PLOT

Moreno is one of only 11 women from Lewis-McChord to die in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and one of only two women from the local base who were commissioned officers when they were killed.

Moreno died with Sgt. Patrick Hawkins and Spc. Cody Patterson of the Georgia-based 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment and special agent Joseph M. Peters of a military police unit based in Italy.

The Army says their sacrifices stymied an attack “that would have resulted in the deaths of unknown multitudes of innocent civilians.” At least two insurgents died in the compound; two of them were wearing suicide vests.

The narratives were written to support military honors several soldiers received for their actions in the fight. Moreno posthumously received a Bronze Star. So did Hawkins and Patterson.

Spc. Samuel Crockett, who survived that bloody day, received a Silver Star for risking his life over a two-hour rescue. He played a key role in recovering Moreno’s body after the 11th blast, and in providing life-saving medical aid to a wounded soldier.

He also set off the 12th and final bomb, but it had a low detonation that did not injure him.

The battle began as the soldiers approached the compound in Kandahar’s Zhari district and called out for its occupants to surrender.

None of the insurgents inside would be taken alive.

WOMAN IN SUICIDE VEST

The first to die was an Afghan woman walking out of the compound wearing a suicide vest.

She detonated the explosive, killing herself, wounding six troops and setting off a second blast nearby. Two soldiers rushing to help troops wounded in the first blast hit the third bomb. A second enemy fighter died in those early blasts, too.

An Afghan insurgent who ran away from the building detonated the fourth explosive, another suicide vest. The bomb killed him and a military working dog named Jani.

Moreno heard a call from a staff sergeant to help a wounded soldier. At the same time, the battle’s ground commander told all of the soldiers to stay where they were.

Her Bronze Star commendation uses dry, formal military language to describe the decision she faced.

"Disregarding her own well-being," it reads, "Moreno unhesitatingly moved to assist (the soldiers) upon realizing the severity of the wounds sustained by her fellow teammates."

"While in transit, Moreno detonated Device No. 5 and was killed in action."

Few could make the same choice.

"None of us would have done what you did, running into hell to save your wounded brothers, knowing full well you probably wouldn’t make it back," the commander of Moreno’s female Special Operations support team in Afghanistan, Capt. Amanda King, later wrote in a eulogy.

'FOLLOW ME'

The battle did not end with Moreno’s sacrifice.

"Follow me," Hawkins told Patterson as they made their move to reach the wounded.

Patterson stepped on a mine, the sixth detonation. He stumbled and hit the seventh, delivering fatal wounds to both him and Hawkins.

Peters, the military police officer, set off explosions No. 8 and No. 9 after working to clear a helicopter landing zone for medical evacuations.

Crockett arrived with a 20-soldier force dispatched to clear the area of mines and rescue the wounded. He was trained for the job as a soldier in a North Carolina-based explosives command.

He cleared space for medics to work on casualties and made his way to isolated Rangers, escorting them through the mine belt to safety. He managed to retrieve Hawkins, the fallen military dog and various pieces of sensitive military equipment without detonating more bombs.

"His focus on retrieving teammates from stranded positions ultimately preserved their lives," his Silver Star commendation reads.

11TH EXPLOSIVE

Moreno’s body remained on the field.

Three soldiers from Crockett’s unit tried to retrieve her, but struck the 11th explosive.

Crockett ran to them, halting at the edge of his cleared path.

He saw his platoon sergeant injured but standing. Crockett guided him back to safe ground.

With no clear path to his two newly wounded teammates, Crockett got down to the ground and swept the earth for mines with his own hands.

He reached a private first class who lost his right leg to the bomb. Crockett applied a tourniquet and “single-handedly dragged him to an area where medics could safely render treatment.”

There was one more injured teammate left to recover from the 11th explosion. Crockett set off the final blast as he stepped to the wounded sergeant.

It didn’t kill him, so he continued with the rescue. He chose a different path, again swept the ground with his hands, and brought his teammate back to safety.

Still, Moreno’s body remained where she fell.

Crockett got as close as he could to the fallen nurse, attached a drag line to her and pulled her to the safe area.

With Moreno recovered, the operators made the call to leave the compound.

Finally, they got out of hell. They did not leave one of their own behind.

Read this.

(via taco-man-andre)

US Army Sergeant First Class Matthew I. Leggett. 20 AUG 2014.

Died in Kabul, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered during an enemy attack. Leggett was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion, XVIII Airborne Corps out of Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

I swear to support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic.
atlanticinfocus:

From National Guard Sent to Ferguson, Missouri, After Week of Chaos and Protest, one of 30 photos. A law enforcement officer in a tactical vehicle watches after a device was fired to disperse a crowd on Sunday, August 17, 2014, during a protest for Michael Brown, who was killed by a police officer last Saturday in Ferguson, Missouri. As night fell Sunday in Ferguson, another peaceful protest quickly deteriorated after marchers pushed toward one end of a street. Police attempted to push them back by firing tear gas and shouting over a bullhorn that the protest was no longer peaceful. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

[That moment when law enforcement officers, sworn to serve and protect the public, become the acknowledged domestic enemies of the Constitution. -R] High-res

I swear to support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic.

atlanticinfocus:

From National Guard Sent to Ferguson, Missouri, After Week of Chaos and Protest, one of 30 photos. A law enforcement officer in a tactical vehicle watches after a device was fired to disperse a crowd on Sunday, August 17, 2014, during a protest for Michael Brown, who was killed by a police officer last Saturday in Ferguson, Missouri. As night fell Sunday in Ferguson, another peaceful protest quickly deteriorated after marchers pushed toward one end of a street. Police attempted to push them back by firing tear gas and shouting over a bullhorn that the protest was no longer peaceful. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

[That moment when law enforcement officers, sworn to serve and protect the public, become the acknowledged domestic enemies of the Constitution. -R]

(via thescratchedlens)

Leave no man behind.
nativeamericannews:

Missing Soldier’s Mother Fears She Is in Danger
Police, the military, and especially the family of Private Juliet Striped Wolf, Rosebud, seek her safe return. Striped Wolf has been missing since July 1, when she was last seen leaving North Carolina’s Fort Bragg Army Base with Amanda Lee Cardone.
High-res

Leave no man behind.

nativeamericannews:

Missing Soldier’s Mother Fears She Is in Danger

Police, the military, and especially the family of Private Juliet Striped Wolf, Rosebud, seek her safe return. Striped Wolf has been missing since July 1, when she was last seen leaving North Carolina’s Fort Bragg Army Base with Amanda Lee Cardone.

"Special Mercenary Rates"
andrewwadenunn:

Units in the Army have a legacy. The last unit I was in, and the one I felt most attached to was A Company 1/6 and its legacy goes something like this: War of 1812, Mexican War, American Civil War, Indian Wars, War with Spain, Philippine-American War, Mexican Expedition, World War I, World War II, Vietnam War, Panama, War in Southwest Asia, and of course The War in Iraq.
The photograph and card above show a practice called “death cards”. Death cards became a wartime tradition during Vietnam and were featured in Stanley Kubrick’s film Apocalypse Now.
High-res

"Special Mercenary Rates"

andrewwadenunn:

Units in the Army have a legacy. The last unit I was in, and the one I felt most attached to was A Company 1/6 and its legacy goes something like this: War of 1812, Mexican War, American Civil War, Indian Wars, War with Spain, Philippine-American War, Mexican Expedition, World War I, World War II, Vietnam War, Panama, War in Southwest Asia, and of course The War in Iraq.

The photograph and card above show a practice called “death cards”. Death cards became a wartime tradition during Vietnam and were featured in Stanley Kubrick’s film Apocalypse Now.

(via operationzeus)

Shooting into the sun.

[1] Sailors aboard the Whidbey Island-class dock landing ship USS Comstock (LSD 45) re-qualify on 9mm pistols during small arms live fire on the flight deck.

[2] Ship’s Serviceman 3rd Class Maria Kristine H. Villanueva, a native of Temecula, Calif., fires a 9mm pistol on the flight deck of the Whidbey Island-class dock landing ship USS Comstock (LSD 45) during a small arms live fire qualification. 

Comstock is on a scheduled deployment with the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group to promote peace and freedom of the seas by providing deterrence, humanitarian aid and disaster response while supporting the Navy’s Maritime Strategy in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility.

(U.S. Navy photos by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Lenny LaCrosse, 14 AUG 2014.)

obi-wankenblowme:

This is a collection of Tweets from military veterans reacting to the police response in Ferguson. 

And if this shit doesn’t scare you, I don’t know what will.

(via valkyrien)

SOLDIER STORIES: A day in Iraq through the eyes of a Chinook pilot.

[1] A CH-47D Chinook helicopter sits along the 6th Battalion, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade flight line at Contingency Operating Base Speicher, Iraq.

[2] A CH-47D Chinook helicopter from 6th BN, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade, sling loads fuel blivets to a Forward Armament and Refueling Point in Iraq.

[3] Chief Warrant Officer Three Scott Moore, Company B, 6th Battalion, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade, gets his flight gear ready for another night mission out of Contingency Operating Base Speicher transporting passengers to various locations in Iraq. Moore has flown Chinooks for five years and been a U.S. Army pilot for 14.

(Photos and article by Staff Sergeant Ryan Matson, 25 MAR 2006.)

You name it, Chief Warrant Officer Three Scott Moore, Company B, 6th Battalion, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade, has probably flown it during his 14-year military career. 

He started with UH-1s in 1992, immediately after he had graduated from college and then from flight school, while serving in the Missouri National Guard. During this time, Moore also flew Cobras. From 1998 until 2001, Moore was an Apache attack pilot. Since then, Moore has settled into the cockpit of his newest, and quite possibly last, Army aircraft, the CH47D Chinook helicopter. 

"I envisioned myself as one of those guys who spent 20 years flying the same aircraft," he said. "I didn’t plan on flying several types of helicopters, it just kind of worked out that way."

In fact, of the four types of Army helicopters in the aviation brigade he’s deployed with (the 101st Combat Aviation Brigade), Moore has flown two: Apaches, and Chinooks. He has not flown Kiowas and Blackhawks. During his career, Moore has also flown every type of Army mission: he has flown attack missions with Apaches, Air Assaults and troop and cargo transport with Chinooks, Medical Evacuations (MEDEVACs) with Hueys, and just about everything else in between. And while he said he has loved flying the three different airframes he has flown so far, he said the Chinook is a particular favorite. 

"The Chinook is the most awesome airframe I’ve ever flown in my life," Moore said. "It’s the best instrumented, the best total package, it virtually flies itself. It really is the nicest airframe to fly in the Army."

Moore affectionately refers to the Chinook as ‘the workhorse.” It is capable of lifting a combined gross maximum weight of 50,000 pounds, and up to 26,000 pounds on the center hook of the three cargo hooks attached to the bottom of the helicopter. Each one of the blades on the two rotors of the $23 million aircraft weigh 350 pounds and turn in opposite directions, powered by two engines, which each operate at 50 percent of their total potential power output (if a helicopter is to lose an engine, the other will operate at 100 percent capacity to compensate.) 

Besides its tremendous power and lifting capacity, the Chinook is also known for its troop and cargo hauling ability in the cabin area (inside the helicopter). The aircraft has seats for 32 Soldiers and more can be carried if necessary.
He said a good example of the lifting capability and spaciousness of the Chinook is the fact that a High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle can be driven up the ramp into the cabin area of the helicopter, while another can be carried underneath it.

To the people who knew him growing up, Moore said it is no surprise he ended up an Army helicopter pilot. "It was always a dream for me," he said. "If you would have talked to my parents when I was little, they would have told you, "Oh Scotty, he’s going to be in the Army. He wants to fly helicopters."

Moore’s passion for flying is so great that he turned down more money and higher rank to continue doing it. He was a captain when he went to Panama as a staff officer, and every day that he was sitting at his desk instead of in a cockpit, Moore said he was miserable and longed to get back in the air.

"When I entered the Army, I really didn’t understand what warrant officers were, and that they were the pilots who flew all the time," he said. "My dream was to fly. If you have a dream, you have to go for it."

So Moore went to Warrant Officer School and in May of 1998, he became a Warrant Officer One and climbed back into the cockpit, and hasn’t looked back since.

On his second deployment [in 2006], Moore said his primary mission in Iraq is to fly battlefield circulation missions throughout Iraq on a mission known as the Eagle Express. If you name a town in Iraq, Moore said he’s probably been there. He takes passengers around the country and flies on a constant basis, usually several times a week. In addition to these missions, Moore also flies combat missions, primarily Air Assaults, in which troops and equipment are moved through the air to a combat area.

Though the actual flying mission may only take a few hours, hours of preparation for the crew and on the aircraft take place before the helicopter takes off. If one is to follow him through his daily routine, one would find Moore starting to prepare for a flight at 7 p.m. around 3 p.m. as he did for his flight Feb. 5, an Eagle Express Mission. On this night, Moore, the co-pilot, would be flying with Chief Warrant Officer Four Gary Brackmeier, a veteran pilot who had been flying Chinooks since the Vietnam War era. The rest of the crew was comprised the flight engineer, crew chief and door gunner.

When he arrived at the battalion headquarters, already in his tan flight suit, the first thing Moore did was receive the mission, which indicated where he would be flying and picking up passengers throughout Iraq on this particular mission. At this point the crew had already conducted daily flight inspections. By 4 p.m., Moore had received the brief on the weather for the flight. Next he and Brackmeier got the intelligence report, which detailed enemy activity within the last 24 hours as well as possible points of concern along the route. During this time, the pilots from all aircrafts on the evening’s mission paid close attention to Brackmeier’s wisdom as he suggested methods of avoiding certain threats in the area. By 4:15, the pilots joined their crews for the evening’s flight brief where all the people involved in the evenings mission were informed of its details and last minute details, questions and concerns were addressed. The crew then grabbed some quick chow and met at the aircraft at 6:15, giving them 45 minutes to do some pre-flight inspections, a run-up and communications check before departing at 7 p.m.

"You can always give time back, you can’t get it back," Brackmeier advised.

From 7 to almost 11 p.m., Moore and Brackmeier picked up and transported Soldiers throughout Iraq, before returning to COB Speicher for post-flight inspections and the end of the mission. He said the typical Eagle Express mission usually runs between three and six hours, meaning the workdays of the pilots and crew often last 12 hours or more.

The mission was flown entirely under night vision goggles, which is something Moore said he enjoys. "As soon as you fly with them once, you realize you’re either a night vision guy or not a night vision guy," he said. "I love flying with them."

After all these years of flying, Moore is about to reach yet another milestone in his career. Already a certified UH-1 instructor pilot, Moore is about to be evaluated to become a PC (Pilot in Command). When a pilot starts flying, he starts as a PI (pilot), with a certain readiness level based on the amount of hours they have flown and the level of proficiency they demonstrate to the standardization pilots. Moore will once again make the jump to PC level in yet another aircraft, meaning his senior pilots have enough confidence in his knowledge and ability to operate Chinooks that they will give him a comprehensive flight test for the chance to become a PC. A PC is in charge of the aircraft.

After 14 years of flying, there is one more flight Moore is looking forward to— “the flight home at the end of this deployment.” Back home to Tennessee, to his wife and children.

Evening Quickie #soldierporn: Kiowa Warrior coming home.
A OH-58D Kiowa Warrior returns from a reconnaissance mission at FOB Fenty. The Kiowa Warrior is a scout helicopter that is primarily operated in an armed reconnaissance role in support of ground troops. (Courtesy photo, 1 JUN 2014.) High-res

Evening Quickie #soldierporn: Kiowa Warrior coming home.

A OH-58D Kiowa Warrior returns from a reconnaissance mission at FOB Fenty. The Kiowa Warrior is a scout helicopter that is primarily operated in an armed reconnaissance role in support of ground troops. (Courtesy photo, 1 JUN 2014.)